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Rudy Giuliani: Trump won’t throw me under the bus but I have ‘good insurance’ in case he does

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Rudy Giuliani says he has no doubt that President Trump will remain loyal to him, but he joked that he has “good insurance” just in case things don’t turn out as he expects, The Guardian reports.

When asked by The Guardian in a phone interview if he’s worried about being “thrown under the bus” by Trump, Giuliani replied, “I’m not, but I do have very, very good insurance, so if he does, all my hospital bills will be paid.”

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Giuliani’s lawyer interjected to point out that “he’s joking.”

His comments come as speculation grows that he’ll be painted as a rogue actor by Republicans regarding the Ukraine scandal enveloping the White House.

Giuliani told The Guardian that he had no knowledge of the call between Trump and EU ambassador Gordon Sondland, where Trump reportedly inquired about “investigations” he wanted the Ukrainian government to conduct targeting his political rivals — investigations that Sondland reportedly said Giuliani was “pushing for.”

“I’m not sure this is very solid testimony. In court we would call it hearsay, triple hearsay. It would not even be admissible. But if you are asking me flat out had I ever heard of a conversation like that? No,” Giuliani said.

“I thought it was a weak way to start a trial,” he added.

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“I acted properly as his lawyer,” Giuliani continued. “I did what a good lawyer is supposed to do. I dug up evidence that helped to show the case against him was false. That there was a great deal of collusion going on someplace else other than Russia. And then I stepped on the number one minefield, which is Joe Biden, who is heavily protected by the Washington press corps.”


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Stunning shift as Amy Klobuchar ‘tones things down’ after Ted Cruz rants about ‘Beavis and Butt-Head’ at IG hearing

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Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) loudly and angrily bashed the Federal Bureau of Investigation during his time to speak during Wednesday's hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Cruz ended his speech with two cultural references from the last century, citing fictional spy Jason Bourne who was first introduced by novelist Robert Ludlum in 1980 and Mike Judge's character's Beavis and Butt-head from the TV show of the same name that debuted in 1993.

"This wasn't Jason Bourne, this was Beavis and Butt-head," Cruz argued.

Cruz was followed by Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), who quickly shifted away from such a style of interrogation.

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Indicted Giuliani henchmen tried to broker Ukrainian gas deal at Trump’s DC hotel: report

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Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, the two associates of Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani who were indicted on election fraud charges earlier this year, reportedly tried to broker a major deal with the CEO of Ukraine’s state-owned natural gas company at President Donald Trump's flagship hotel in Washington D.C.

Vice reports that the two men pitched Naftogaz CEO Andriy Kobolyev on a deal to export natural gas from the United States to Ukraine at the Trump International Hotel in Washington shortly after former American ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch was recalled after being targeted with a smear campaign.

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Jimmy Kimmel’s Christmas skit causes self-appointed Catholic spokesperson to have unhinged meltdown

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This Tuesday, late night talk-show host Jimmy Kimmel ran a skit featuring a “charming nativity scene in Attleboro, Massachusetts,” where he got a surprise visit from his “foul-mouthed little friend 2-year-old Tommy Brady Fitzpatrick and his beautiful mother Darlene.”

But the skit didn't go over so well with Catholic League president Bill Donohue, who railed against the segment in a post to his website.

"On last night’s Jimmy Kimmel show on ABC, they did a skit about the nativity scene where they crossed the line," Donohue wrote. "Referring to the Shroud of Turin, believed to be the burial cloth of Jesus, as 'the shroud of urine,' is needlessly offensive."

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