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CNN’s John Avlon busts GOP’s latest Trump defense for spiraling into Orwellian doublespeak to derail impeachment

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CNN’s regular John Avlon took a harsh look at Republican efforts to derail the impeachment of Donald Trump and accused the GOP of creating a talking points strategy straight out of George Orwell’s “1984.”

As part of his “Reality Check” segment, Avlon broke down how Trump and his stalwart supporters in the GOP have attempted to snow the public with outright lies.

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Speaking with hosts Alisyn Camerota and John Berman, Avlon explained, “We’ve gotten the first look at the GOP’s impeachment defense, and it is essentially denial; the president did nothing wrong despite the clear fact pattern that emerged after two weeks of testimony from Trump staffers.”

“Here’s how the New York Times summed up the report: ‘The Republicans did not concede a single point of wrongdoing or hint of misbehavior by the president,'” Avlon read. “Not surprisingly, the president tweeted his thanks out to Republicans saying quote, ‘I read the Republicans’ report on the impeachment hoax. Great job! Can we go to the Supreme Court to stop?’ Of course the president is pleased with Republicans because they seem to be taking dictation from the White House.”

“We’re sowing the seeds for a broader embrace of unreality,” he elaborated. “Fifty-three percent of Republicans say that Donald Trump is a better president than Abraham Lincoln. On one hand, I don’t even know what to do with that, except to say we need remedial American history ASAP. I’m guessing it’s a reflection of a reflexive no-nothing team-ism. That’s dangerous in a democracy that depends on being able to reason together.”

“Denying facts, ditching history, abandoning principles, it’s leading Republicans towards something George Orwell once warned us about,” he warned before quoting the author’s best known work. “‘The party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final most essential command.'”

Watch below:

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Trump announces Rudy Giuliani ‘wants to go before Congress’ and testify about his Ukraine dealings

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President Donald Trump on Saturday said that his personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, wanted to testify before Congress.

Speaking to reporters as he departed for a Republican fundraiser in Florida, Trump praised the former New York City mayor.

"Rudy, as you know, has been one of the great crime fighters of the last 50 years," Trump said of his lawyer, who is reportedly under federal investigation for breaking the law.

"And, he did get back from Europe just recently and I know -- he has not told me what he found, but I think he wants to go before Congress and say, and also to the attorney general and the Department of Justice," Trump said.

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GOP governors are refusing to do Trump’s bidding and ducking him on the campaign trail: report

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On Saturday, Maggie Haberman of The New York Times profiled how President Donald Trump is having less luck whipping Republican governors into line than Republican senators, including governors who arguably owe their election to his support.

"In Florida, Mr. Trump’s aides helped save the flailing candidacy of Ron DeSantis in the 2018 Republican primary, and then the general election," wrote Haberman. "Also last year, in Georgia, Mr. Trump helped pull Brian Kemp over the finish line in both the primary and the general election. In both cases, Mr. Trump’s advisers implored him to stay out of the primaries, and he agreed to — only to surprise his aides by jumping in to support Mr. DeSantis and Mr. Kemp."

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Courts have avoided refereeing between Congress and the president — Trump may change all that

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President Donald Trump’s refusal to hand over records to Congress and allow executive branch employees to provide information and testimony to Congress during the impeachment battle is the strongest test yet of legal principles that over the past 200 years have not yet been fully defined by U.S. courts.

It’s not the first test: Struggles over power among the political branches predate our Constitution. The framers chose not to, and probably could not, fully resolve them.

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