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NASA satellite finds crashed Indian Moon lander

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A NASA satellite orbiting the Moon has found India’s Vikram lander which crashed on the lunar surface in September, the US space agency said Monday.

NASA released an image taken by its Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) that showed the site of the spacecraft’s impact (September 6 in India and September 7 in the US) and associated debris field, with parts scattered over almost two dozen locations spanning several kilometers.

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In a statement, NASA said it released a mosaic image of the site on September 26, inviting the public to search it for signs of the lander.

It added that a person named Shanmuga Subramanian contacted the LRO project with a positive identification of debris — with the first piece found about 750 meters northwest of the main crash site.

Blasting off in July, emerging Asian giant India had hoped with its Chandrayaan-2 (“Moon Vehicle 2”) mission to become just the fourth country after the United States, Russia and regional rival China to make a successful Moon landing, and the first on the lunar south pole.

The main spacecraft, which remains in orbit around the Moon, dropped the unmanned lander Vikram for a descent that would take five days, but the probe went silent just 2.1 kilometers above the surface.

Days after the failed landing, the Indian Space Research Organization said it had located the lander, but hadn’t been able to establish communication.

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The ancient Greeks had alternative facts too – they were just more chill about it

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In an age of deepfakes and alternative facts, it can be tricky getting at the truth. But persuading others – or even yourself – what is true is not a challenge unique to the modern era. Even the ancient Greeks had to confront different realities.

Take the story of Oedipus. It is a narrative that most people think they know – Oedipus blinded himself after finding out he killed his father and married his mother, right?

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2020 Election

Donald Trump Jr rants ‘stupid’ CNN has done more damage to elections than the Russians

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President Donald Trump's eldest son complained that CNN was attempting to undermine democracy by reporting on Russian election interference.

The network, like other U.S. media outlets, has reported on efforts by the Kremlin to influence the 2020 election, just as U.S. intelligence agencies and law enforcement agree Russia did during the 2016 election.

Donald Trump Jr. -- who infamously accepted an invitation during his father's first campaign to hear dirt on Hillary Clinton from a Russian lawyer -- accused CNN of manipulating the election by reporting those Russian efforts.

"CNN is so stupid they don’t even understand the irony of how they’ve done more damage than any 'Russian operation' could ever have dreamed," Trump Jr tweeted, in response to a conservative blogger. "The media has done one hell of a job these past 4 years in attempting to deligitmize [sic] our election process."

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Blacks are at higher risk for Alzheimer’s, but why?

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Blacks are at higher risk for several health conditions in the U.S. This is true for heart disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes and stroke, which are often chronic diseases. And it is also for Alzheimer’s disease, in which blacks have two times higher incidence rates than whites.

So, why do these disparities exist, especially in Alzheimer’s disease, which isn’t typically considered a chronic disease but a progressive one, or one that worsens over time?

Some researchers attribute the gap to both societal and systemic factors related to inequities in education, socioeconomics, income and health care access. Other factors such as stress, diet, lifestyle and genetics may also contribute. However, there’s a less-explored question in Alzheimer’s that could contribute to this disparity: Is the underlying biology of the disease somehow different in blacks and non-Hispanic whites?

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