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Adam Schiff: GOP senators should allow Bolton to testify or face the music when his book comes out

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Appearing on CNN’s “New Day,” Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) — who is leading the impeachment prosecution of Donald Trump on the Senate floor — said Republicans can now either agree to let former national security adviser John Bolton to testify about the president’s Ukraine scandal or face the wrath of voters when the former White House aide’s book comes out.

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Late Sunday the New York Times reported, “President Trump directly tied the withholding of almost $400 million in American security aid to investigations that he sought from Ukrainian officials, according to an unpublished manuscript of a book that John R. Bolton, Mr. Trump’s former national security adviser, wrote about his time in the White House.” 

Speaking with host Alisyn Camerota, Schiff addressed the revelations in the book that completely undercuts the White House’s impeachment defense that the president was exclusively focused on Ukraine corruption.

Asked what happens now, the California Democrat said Republicans can either allow Bolton to testify or wait until March when his book comes out and be forced to explain their dereliction of duty.

“It completely blasts another hole in the president’s defense,” Schiff told the CNN host. “And I think for the senators, and I’m not talking about the four who have been so much the focus of attention, for every senator, Democrat and Republican, I don’t know how you can explain that you wanted a search for the truth in this trial and say you don’t want to hear from a witness who had a direct conversation about the central allegation in the articles of impeachment.”

“Because all of these senators, on March 17th when this book comes out, are going to be asked if they don’t support calling him as a witness, why didn’t you want to hear from him when he could have given you information before you rendered your verdict,” Schiff continued before adding, “I would not want to be in a position to answer that question.”

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2020 Election

Jared Kushner vows there will be ‘no drama’ in Trump’s second term: ‘It’s high-competence’

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Jared Kushner vowed on Friday that a second term from his father-in-law, President Donald Trump,  would be both efficient and drama-free.

The senior White House adviser claimed that Trump's re-election campaign was running smoothly, much as the president's second term supposedly would, while speaking with organizer Matt Schlapp at the Conservative Political Actions Conference (CPAC).

"The way that you see the campaign being run, there's no leaks. There's no drama. I would say it's high-competence, low-drama," Kushner said. "Everything is very efficiently run, and I think that's exemplary of how President Trump would run his second term in office."

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William Barr promotes Christian tyranny in latest speech

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I’ve said it before, and if you’re reading this, you’ve very likely heard the same thing darkly muttered among liberals and progressives if you haven’t said it yourself: I never thought anything could possibly make me miss Attorney General Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III. And yet, with his willingness to throw away our norms, checks, and balances, to politicize the Justice Department, to sacrifice the rule of law itself on the altar of Trump—current Attorney General William Barr has done it. As authoritarian as he was, invoking Romans 13 to defend the Trump administration’s indefensibly inhumane policy of caging children separated from their asylum-seeking parents, Sessions had at least enough genuine concern for the rule of law to recuse himself from the Mueller investigation, against the tweeter-in-chief’s explicit wishes.

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2020 Election

How the religious vote in 2020 could tip 6 swing states

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Let's look at the bad news from this Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) tracking survey first: despite remarkably lousy-but-stable favorability numbers (41% approve, 55% disapprove), Pres. Trump has a strong chance of being re-elected in November, unless the situation changes significantly between now and then.

To understand why from a religious perspective, consider three factors: partisanship, race, and region. Republicans, whites, and residents of the South and Midwest are most likely to support Trump. White evangelicals tend to be conservative, giving the president a strong base in the South—this much is not surprising. Less obvious is that after Mormons, white Catholics and white mainline Protestants are Trump's strongest supporters in the religious economy.

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