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California offers to reimburse Trump for abortions — but he has to free the women from non-disclosure agreements

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The state of California is offering to reimburse President Donald Trump for any abortions he’s paid for in the state, but there’s a catch.

On Friday, the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a “notice of violation” against the state for mandating universal abortion coverage in health insurance plans sold in the state, which the administration claims is “unlawful discrimination.”

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“Once again, President Trump’s administration is delivering on his promise to protect human life and all Americans’ freedom of conscience,” HHS Secretary Alex Azar said in a statement.

That is not how the state of California saw things, which resulted in harsh criticism from state Senate President pro Tempore Toni G. Atkins (D-San Diego).

“It is all too convenient that the Trump Administration is choosing this moment – as political pressure heats up and the impeachment trial is underway – to once again come after California for our lawful, steadfast protection of women and abortion rights. I stand with women in California in our defense of reproductive freedom for all, and we will continue our efforts to ensure access to reproductive health services,” Atkins vowed.

Atkins then issued something of a dare — or challenge — to the commander-in-chief.

“If Donald Trump is dissatisfied with the abortion services California provides, we will happily reimburse him for any and all abortions he has paid for in California, immediately upon receipt of legal documents freeing the potential women involved from any non-disclosure agreements they may have been compelled to enter into,” Atkins offered.

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2020 Election

Trump blasted as ‘pathological liar’ for claiming stock market is ‘starting to look very good’ after 1,000 point crash

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The COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic spreading across the world has present challenges for President Donald Trump.

In addition to the public health challenge facing the administration, Trump's 2020 reelection campaign is also faced with an economic crisis as the virus disrupts global supply chains.

"Investors around the world retreated from stocks and piled into haven assets including government bonds and gold, reflecting escalating worries that the coronavirus will disrupt the global economy," The Wall Street Journal reported Monday. "The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped more than 1,000 points—its biggest point decline in more than two years; the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note approached a record low; and gold prices climbed for the eighth straight session to a seven-year high."

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2020 Election

Here are 11 of the most popular progressive policies for candidates to run on — and 5 of the least popular

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New polling from the progressive pollster Data for Progress, described in a new piece Monday at Vox, points the way forward for Democrats looking to oust President Donald Trump from the White House and enact a liberal policy agenda.

Progressives often argue that their plans are broadly popular with Americans, and that these ideas are only prevented from becoming reality because of an obstinate Republican Party weaponizing racism and misinformation, archaic political institutions that stymie significant efforts at reform, and corruption across the two parties that allows special and corporate interests to undermine the popular will. And there is a fair amount of truth in this idea — some progressive idea are remarkably popular, and there's no good reason they haven't been implemented yet.

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US economy faces long-lasting damage from Trump’s trade war: fed official

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The trade conflict of the past two years likely left a mark on the US economy, even with the recent agreement to defuse the situation, a Federal Reserve official said Monday.

The outbreak of the new coronavirus in China adds another risk factor to the outlook, which otherwise seemed poised to provide steady growth, said Loretta Mester, president of the Federal Reserve's regional bank in Cleveland.

"At this point, it is difficult to assess the magnitude of the economic effects, but this new source of uncertainty is something I will be carefully monitoring," she said of the epidemic.

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