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Clinton impeachment investigator calls BS on McConnell’s trial rules: ‘The Trump investigation is incomplete’

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One of Ken Starr’s former investigators called out Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s lie about the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump.

The Kentucky Republican claims the Senate will adopt the same rules as those used in Bill Clinton’s impeachment trial, but attorney Paul Rosenzweig — who helped investigate the case against that president — says in a new column for The Atlantic that McConnell’s offer is disingenuous, at best.

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“While it has a patina of reasonableness,” Rosenzweig wrote, “the offer is little more than posturing.”

While both Clinton and Trump each threw up many roadblocks in their impeachment investigations, Rosenzweig argued that the cases against each president were remarkably different.

The investigation of Clinton into perjury and obstruction of justice charges lasted nine months, and involved nearly 100 witnesses, hundreds of hours of testimony, thousands of documents and, eventually, even testimony and a blood sample from the president himself, after all of his legal defenses were exhausted.

The evidence in that case was so overwhelming that Senate Republicans called only one witness — Starr himself — to summarize the case.

A similar procedure might have played out, Rosenzeig argued, if House Democrats had impeached the president based on the voluminous findings in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report — but that’s obviously not the case before the Senate.

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Trump’s pressure scheme against Ukraine was not the subject of a criminal investigation — as was Clinton’s affair with Monica Lewinsky and Trump’s campaign ties to Russia — but was instead was probed only in the House impeachment inquiry, and for less than three months.

The White House blocked many of the key witnesses subpoenaed by House Democrats and refused to turn over documents sought by congressional investigators, and the process moved so quickly that legal battles over those efforts still have not concluded.

“So, unlike with Clinton, the Trump impeachment investigation is incomplete,” Rosenzweig wrote. “Far from being given an exhaustive record on which to make a determination, the Senate has received only part of the story from the House.”

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2020 Election

‘Nice deflection, Mr President’: Adam Schiff busts Trump for trying to blame him for his leaky administration

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Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) took a shot at President Donald Trump on Sunday morning after the president tried to blame him for the leak describing a classified meeting lawmakers had with an intelligence official who warned the bipartisan group that the Kremlin is trying to help the president get re-elected.

As the president prepared to leave the White House for India, he told reporters that Schiff was to blame for the leaked meeting story, with the president insisting he personally had not been briefed on the report explosive report.

Responding to a 'Meet the Press" clip of the president making his accusation, Schiff tweeted back: "Nice deflection, Mr. President. But your false claims fool no one. You welcomed Russian help in 2016, tried to coerce Ukraine’s help in 2019, and won’t protect our elections in 2020. Now you fired your intel chief for briefing Congress about it. You’ve betrayed America. Again."

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George Conway taunts Republican voters for sticking by ‘psycho buffoon’ Trump

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Conservative attorney George Conway launched a mini-tweet storm on Sunday morning just as President Donald Trump was leaving the country for a visit to India, telling Republican voters that they didn't have to settle for him being their candidate in 2016.

Along the way, he described the president as "a psycho and a buffoon."

In the series of tweets, Conway -- the husband of Trump White House adviser Kellyanne Conway -- noted that a more mainstream candidate could have won in 2016, writing, "Some perspective for supporters of @realDonaldTrump: A stable and competent GOP candidate would have won the popular vote in 2016, perhaps even by a few percentage points; a stable and competent GOP president, having inherited such a strong economy and goosed it with massive deficit spending, would have approval ratings of at least 55%."

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Why Americans are afraid to have babies

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Many Democrats are completely fixated on getting Donald Trump out of the Oval Office, no matter what it takes (or which Democratic presidential candidate). While that's certainly an important and obvious goal, the political stakes in 2020 are far, far greater than that.

This article first appeared in Salon.

Yes, there are compounding, existential and political crises that go beyond corrupt Beltway intrigue so much of the media fixates on.

Capitalism is in crisis. It is manifested in the deterioration in local conditions, a decline in the birthrate as well as in entrepreneurship.

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