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Fox and Friends begs viewers not to watch ‘boring’ impeachment trial: ‘Turn to us to summarize it’

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Fox News hosts assured viewers who hadn’t tuned in to the first day of the impeachment trial that they hadn’t missed anything.

The hosts of “Fox and Friends” told their viewers that Day One of President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial was long, opaque and ran well into the morning hours — which Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell insisted upon.

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“There were snippets, and we’re showing you the good stuff,” said co-host Steve Doocy. “It was unbelievably boring. I don’t know how people can follow it.”

Co-host Ainsley Earhardt summed up the first day by saying Republicans had approved the rules, but Democrats insisted “over and over and over” that they wanted additional witnesses, and co-host Pete Hegseth assured viewers they didn’t need to watch themselves.

“We watched so that you don’t have to watch the entire thing,” Hegseth said. “If you watched it, you felt like you were watching opening arguments — those haven’t even started yet. This is just the debate over the rules. I was sitting back watching last night thinking, this is a circus. My wife Jen corrected me — at least sir curses are entertaining. This is just a show, you know how it’s going to end, 53-47 on every vote.”

Earhardt reassured viewers who hadn’t tuned in that they weren’t alone.

“I don’t think the majority of people watched,” she said. “I think they just turn to us to be able to summarize it for them because it was so long.”

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Congress fixes – just a bit – the unpopular, ‘unfair’ rule that stopped injured service members from suing for damages

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Members of the military who have long been barred by law from collecting damages from the federal government for injuries off the battlefield will finally be able to do so after Congress stepped in to amend the law.

The legislation represents progress for injured service members – but still limits who among them may press for damages.

Up until the end of World War II, the U.S. government enjoyed “sovereign immunity,” a vestige of British rule when “the king could do no wrong” and the government could not be sued.

But in 1946, faced with the prospect of World War II veterans returning from the front only to be hit and killed in an accident on base, Congress enacted the Federal Tort Claims Act. Congress felt that it was only fair to allow people to recover damages for personal injury from the government when the government was negligent or irresponsible about caring for people’s safety.

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2020 Election

Minnesota pastor leads campaign to try to shift evangelical vote away from Trump

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MINNEAPOLIS — The Rev. Doug Pagitt jumped on stage at his former Minneapolis church with a message that he and his entourage are repeating across the country: Evangelical voters, you can stay true to your Christian faith but not vote for President Donald Trump.Their “Vote Common Good” campaign, conducted from a bright orange bus making stops at every Democratic state primary, represents the small cracks in the evangelical base that helped propel Trump into office. More than 80% of white evangelical Christians voted for Trump in 2016, and continue to support him in his bid for reelection.Pagitt... (more…)

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2020 Election

GOP’s Susan Collins faces tough re-election fight as support plummets following vote to acquit Trump

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Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, appears to be facing the toughest election of her career, with her support plummeting in a new poll.

Collins is in a virtual tie with Maine Speaker of the House Sara Gideon, one of four Democrats running to face the GOP incumbent, according to a new Colby College poll first reported by The Wall Street Journal. Gideon leads the Democratic field in the poll by more than 50% and is the overwhelming favorite to face the Republican in November.

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