Quantcast
Connect with us

Frantic Trump tries to block Senate from calling Bolton after bombshell book blows up his Ukraine defense

Published

on

President Donald Trump went to bed fretting about John Bolton, and he woke up worried about his former national security adviser.

Excerpts from Bolton’s new book leaked Sunday, claiming that Trump told him that Ukraine aid was tied to an investigation of Joe Biden and his son — putting new pressure on Republican senators to approve additional witness testimony in the impeachment trial.

ADVERTISEMENT

“The Democrat controlled House never even asked John Bolton to testify,” Trump tweeted Monday morning. “It is up to them, not up to the Senate!”

Bolton refused to show up for a scheduled deposition in November before the House impeachment inquiry, but has said he would testify before the Senate trial if he was subpoenaed.

Trump denied Bolton’s explosive claims after midnight.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I NEVER told John Bolton that the aid to Ukraine was tied to investigations into Democrats, including the Bidens,” Trump tweeted. “In fact, he never complained about this at the time of his very public termination. If John Bolton said this, it was only to sell a book.”

“With that being said, the transcripts of my calls with President Zelensky are all the proof that is needed, in addition to the fact that President Zelensky & the Foreign Minister of Ukraine said there was no pressure and no problems,” he tweeted. “Additionally, I met with President Zelensky at the United Nations (Democrats said I never met) and released the military aid to Ukraine without any conditions or investigations – and far ahead of schedule. I also allowed Ukraine to purchase Javelin anti-tank missiles. My Administration has done far more than the previous Administration.”

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Jared Kushner vows there will be ‘no drama’ in Trump’s second term: ‘It’s high-competence’

Published

on

Jared Kushner vowed on Friday that a second term from his father-in-law, President Donald Trump,  would be both efficient and drama-free.

The senior White House adviser claimed that Trump's re-election campaign was running smoothly, much as the president's second term supposedly would, while speaking with organizer Matt Schlapp at the Conservative Political Actions Conference (CPAC).

"The way that you see the campaign being run, there's no leaks. There's no drama. I would say it's high-competence, low-drama," Kushner said. "Everything is very efficiently run, and I think that's exemplary of how President Trump would run his second term in office."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

William Barr promotes Christian tyranny in latest speech

Published

on

I’ve said it before, and if you’re reading this, you’ve very likely heard the same thing darkly muttered among liberals and progressives if you haven’t said it yourself: I never thought anything could possibly make me miss Attorney General Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III. And yet, with his willingness to throw away our norms, checks, and balances, to politicize the Justice Department, to sacrifice the rule of law itself on the altar of Trump—current Attorney General William Barr has done it. As authoritarian as he was, invoking Romans 13 to defend the Trump administration’s indefensibly inhumane policy of caging children separated from their asylum-seeking parents, Sessions had at least enough genuine concern for the rule of law to recuse himself from the Mueller investigation, against the tweeter-in-chief’s explicit wishes.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

How the religious vote in 2020 could tip 6 swing states

Published

on

Let's look at the bad news from this Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) tracking survey first: despite remarkably lousy-but-stable favorability numbers (41% approve, 55% disapprove), Pres. Trump has a strong chance of being re-elected in November, unless the situation changes significantly between now and then.

To understand why from a religious perspective, consider three factors: partisanship, race, and region. Republicans, whites, and residents of the South and Midwest are most likely to support Trump. White evangelicals tend to be conservative, giving the president a strong base in the South—this much is not surprising. Less obvious is that after Mormons, white Catholics and white mainline Protestants are Trump's strongest supporters in the religious economy.

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image