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Ivanka Trump’s sister-in-law says she will not vote for the president in 2020

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Karlie Kloss, the sister-in-law of President Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka, revealed on the show “Watch What Happens Live” that she will not vote for the Republican president in 2020.

“I’m sure I’m not the only person in this country who does not necessarily agree with their family on politics,” the “Project Runway” host told host Andy Cohen in a segment which aired Thursday night. “I voted as a Democrat in 2016, and I plan to do the same in 2020.”

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Earlier in the interview, Cohen rolled a viral clip from the show “Project Runway.” After being told that Kloss might not wear one of his designs, a contestant jokingly asked her: “Not even to a dinner with the Kushners?”

The contestant later apologized to Kloss for his quip, insisting that it was not intended to be mean.

“Well, listen, I was honored to be one of the first memes of the decade, but honestly the real tragedy of this whole thing is that no one is talking about how terrible that dress was,” Kloss told Cohen. “That’s why he went home. And no, I would not wear that dress to any dinner.”

Kloss has been outspoken at times about her progressive political views, including posting on Instagram in 2018 about her opposition to President Donald Trump’s family separation policy.

“It’s heartbreaking to watch from halfway across the world what is happening in our own country,” Kloss wrote at the time. “It’s not the time to say ‘there are no words’, there are many. Politicizing the lives of these defenseless children and ripping them from their parents is heartless. We have to be the voices for these kids, and I support anyone standing up to do right by them. What can you do? Many things but FIRST, call your congressperson RIGHT NOW and support the bill, US – S 3036. No matter what side of the aisle you are on – speak up. #KeepFamiliesTogether”

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Kloss’ husband, Joshua Kushner, who is the brother of Ivanka Trump’s husband Jared Kushner, has also been described as a lifelong Democrat. Kloss told Vogue Magazine in 2018 that “Josh and I share a lot of the same liberal values that guide our lives and the things we stand for. We’ve really grown together personally and professionally. Josh knows that I’m just a nerdy, curious human being. I think that’s why he loves me. We have each other’s back.”

Kloss has also argued that the disproportionate attention paid to her connection with the Trumps and questions about whether she converted to Judaism for her husband are motivated by gender bias, explaining to Vogue that “at the end of the day, I’ve had to make decisions based on my own moral compass — forget what the public says, forget social media. I’ve chosen to be with the man I love despite the complications. It’s frustrating, to be honest, that the spotlight is always shifted away from my career toward my relationship. I don’t think the same happens in conversations with men.”

You can watch the full clip below via Twitter:

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https://twitter.com/BravoWWHL/status/1218017600136978432


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2020 Election

Jared Kushner vows there will be ‘no drama’ in Trump’s second term: ‘It’s high-competence’

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Jared Kushner vowed on Friday that a second term from his father-in-law, President Donald Trump,  would be both efficient and drama-free.

The senior White House adviser claimed that Trump's re-election campaign was running smoothly, much as the president's second term supposedly would, while speaking with organizer Matt Schlapp at the Conservative Political Actions Conference (CPAC).

"The way that you see the campaign being run, there's no leaks. There's no drama. I would say it's high-competence, low-drama," Kushner said. "Everything is very efficiently run, and I think that's exemplary of how President Trump would run his second term in office."

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2020 Election

How the religious vote in 2020 could tip 6 swing states

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Let's look at the bad news from this Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) tracking survey first: despite remarkably lousy-but-stable favorability numbers (41% approve, 55% disapprove), Pres. Trump has a strong chance of being re-elected in November, unless the situation changes significantly between now and then.

To understand why from a religious perspective, consider three factors: partisanship, race, and region. Republicans, whites, and residents of the South and Midwest are most likely to support Trump. White evangelicals tend to be conservative, giving the president a strong base in the South—this much is not surprising. Less obvious is that after Mormons, white Catholics and white mainline Protestants are Trump's strongest supporters in the religious economy.

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2020 Election

WATCH: ‘Hoax’ is the word Trump and his top officials keep using when discussing the fatal coronavirus epidemic

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President Donald Trump and top officials in his administration keep using the word "hoax" when attempting to downplay the public health and economic threats from the expanding COVID-19 coronavirus crisis.

Public health officials across the globe have warned the virus is real and deadly.

But on Friday, three top administration officials all used the same "hoax" talking point when discussing the epidemic.

It started with acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney used the term "hoax" while talking about coronavirus at the far-right CPAC meeting.

https://twitter.com/nancylevine/status/1233406055075340288

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