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Trump impeachment defense team may be forced to change tactics to hold off GOP defections: report

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According to a report from Axios, Donald Trump’s defense team is considering an attempt to shorten the president’s Senate trial in order to get it over quickly as Democrats try to pry away Republican defectors.

The report states that “A truncated defense would likely reflect a decision not to contest facts or defend Trump point by point, but rather to try to diminish the legitimacy of Democrats’ overall case and end the trial as quickly as possible.”

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Speaking with reporters, Trump attorney Jay Sekulow stated, “We’re not going to try to run the clock out,” before adding that he hopes to wrap up “Saturday or Monday or Tuesday.”

The report goes on to note that by wrapping up as quickly as possible the White House strategy may alienate some Republican senators who had been promised more time by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY), with Axios stating, “But if the White House moves too abruptly, it risks angering the small group of Republican senators Democrats have been courting to cross party lines to allow new witnesses and evidence in the trial.”

“Instead, the team plans to adjust their arguments to what some of the more vulnerable Senate Republicans need to get them over the acquittal line,” the report states with a source admitting, “They’ll use their time to get their facts out there, however long that may be.”

The source added, “Trump’s team recognizes that some Republicans are eager to hear a full-throated defense of Trump that wipes away any doubts about his culpability.”

You can read more here.

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2020 Election

Donald Trump has launched a 2020 campaign disinformation juggernaut — and it’s gaining speed

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You may be forgiven if you are under the impression that the Trump administration's response to the coronavirus outbreak is just one more example of his incompetence, aggressive ignorance, contempt for science and outright abuse of government. But it's worse than that. For the White House, and especially for Donald Trump's re-election campaign, it's an opportunity to put into play the massive disinformation apparatus they have built for the 2020 presidential race.

This article first appeared in Salon.

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2020 Election

Jared Kushner vows there will be ‘no drama’ in Trump’s second term: ‘It’s high-competence’

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Jared Kushner vowed on Friday that a second term from his father-in-law, President Donald Trump,  would be both efficient and drama-free.

The senior White House adviser claimed that Trump's re-election campaign was running smoothly, much as the president's second term supposedly would, while speaking with organizer Matt Schlapp at the Conservative Political Actions Conference (CPAC).

"The way that you see the campaign being run, there's no leaks. There's no drama. I would say it's high-competence, low-drama," Kushner said. "Everything is very efficiently run, and I think that's exemplary of how President Trump would run his second term in office."

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2020 Election

How the religious vote in 2020 could tip 6 swing states

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Let's look at the bad news from this Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) tracking survey first: despite remarkably lousy-but-stable favorability numbers (41% approve, 55% disapprove), Pres. Trump has a strong chance of being re-elected in November, unless the situation changes significantly between now and then.

To understand why from a religious perspective, consider three factors: partisanship, race, and region. Republicans, whites, and residents of the South and Midwest are most likely to support Trump. White evangelicals tend to be conservative, giving the president a strong base in the South—this much is not surprising. Less obvious is that after Mormons, white Catholics and white mainline Protestants are Trump's strongest supporters in the religious economy.

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