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Bernie Sanders stokes question for Texas Democrats: How would his nomination affect their down-ballot plans?

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Sanders supporters say he’ll bring new voters to the polls to help Democrats flip Texas, but some establishment figures are in panic mode.

U.S. Rep. Marc Veasey is about as restrained as Texans come, but in recent days he has unloaded his unvarnished thoughts on the Democratic presidential primary to practically any reporter he could find.

His message? U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders’ march to the party’s nomination will jeopardize Texas Democrats’ efforts to capture the state House of Representatives and a slew of U.S. House seats across the state.

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“Bernie has no coattails,” said Veasey, who has endorsed former Vice President Joe Biden. “It’s going to be Bernie and his cause taking the party down with him.

“People are sufficiently wary as hell, and from this point on, the scrutiny is going to be very, very high on Sanders,” he added. “When I was in church [Sunday] in southeast Fort Worth, people were coming up to me in tears.”

There’s no doubt that Sanders’ strong showing in the first three states of the nominating contest has sparked strong emotions in Texas politics. The candidate barnstormed the state over the weekend, drawing undeniably enthusiastic crowds of thousands and declaring, “We’re gonna win here in Texas, and in November we’re gonna defeat Trump here in Texas.”

But Veasey is not alone in his fear.

While Sanders supporters proclaim a growing movement that will bring out new voters needed to flip the state, nearly two dozen Texas Democratic officeholders, candidates, activists and donors interviewed for this story expressed concern — sometimes bordering on despair — that a Sanders Democratic nomination is the difference between being on offense or in retreat in Texas this cycle.


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2020 Election

Trump attacks: Only reason ‘they’ don’t want to let schools re-open is to hurt my re-election chances

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President Donald Trump appears to be attacking Democrats, or the large number of parents across the country who are afraid to send their children back to school in the fall over concerns students could contract the coronavirus and get sick or die, or spread it to their families, friends, and teachers.

"Politics," according to the President, is the only reason "they" don't want to allow their children to go back to school.

In a rambling address at the White House Hispanic Prosperity Initiative, the President talked about "allowing those at lower risk such as young, and healthy – children in many cases the immune system is so powerful, so strong – but the young and the healthy to safely return to work and to school."

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2020 Election

Trump is cracking as his distraction superpowers falter amid the coronavirus pandemic

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Donald Trump is dumb — so dumb he literally suggested on live television that scientists should explore injecting household cleaners into people's lungs to cure the coronavirus. But due to what appears to be a serious and undiagnosed personality disorder — his niece Mary Trump, who is a clinical psychologist, suggests it's likely narcissism or sociopathy — Trump managed to stumble backwards into a strategy that works well with the 24-hour cable news ecosystem of national politics. Actually, "strategy" may be too strong a word, but it's inarguable that Trump's short attention span, impulsive nature and all-consuming corruption have meant a constant deluge of scandals and outrages, with each one knocking the last one out of the headlines.

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2020 Election

‘Absolute immunity:’ Kayleigh McEnany claims Trump has monarch-like powers despite Supreme Court ruling

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White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Thursday said that President Donald Trump continues to believe that he has "absolute immunity" from prosecution despite a Supreme Court ruling that said otherwise.

At a White House briefing, McEnany argued that a high court ruling which gives prosecutors the right to subpoena Trump's financial records is actually a "win for the president."

"The president was making general point about deference and on the principal of absolute immunity," she explained. "He believes there should have been more deference [to him by the court]."

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