Doctors optimistic Bay Area lockdown successfully bent the coronavirus curve: report
A doctor prays before surgery (Shutterstock)

The aggressive actions of local governments in the San Francisco Bay Area may have successfully bent the coronavirus curve.


"State leaders and doctors are cautiously optimistic that the Bay Area's early moves to lock down residents two weeks ago have prevented surges of coronavirus patients from overwhelming the region's health care capacity thus far," Politico reported Monday.

"Six Bay Area counties were first in the country to adopt aggressive tactics with an enforceable March 16 order requiring residents to stay at home," Politico noted. "After 14 days — the outermost period at which symptoms are believed to emerge post-infection — doctors at area hospitals are now reporting fewer cases than they expected to see at this point, and officials credit the lockdown with stemming the tide of patients they feared would flood into emergency rooms."

"Northern California offered a rare glimpse of optimism as the U.S. recorded its most coronavirus deaths in one day and Washington, D.C.-area jurisdictions — Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia — issued their first enforceable stay-at-home orders," Politico added. "While officials remain adamant that people stay home and adhere to social-distancing guidelines — the Bay Area Monday extended its stay-at-home order to May 1 — they also are praising residents for following orders and expressing optimism that the measures will continue to work."

"While officials remain adamant that people stay home and adhere to social-distancing guidelines — the Bay Area Monday extended its stay-at-home order to May 1 — they also are praising residents for following orders and expressing optimism that the measures will continue to work.

"Officially, hospital spokespeople are hesitant to identify trends," Politico noted. "But individual doctors say the stay-at-home order has likely helped to keep numbers lower than they would be otherwise."