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Nikki Haley endorses letting state governments go bankrupt — and it immediately blows up in her face

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Former Ambassador Nikki Haley (screengrab)

Former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley on Thursday gave a thumbs-up to Sen. Mitch McConnell’s (R-KY) plan to let state governments go bankrupt — and she was instantly met with furious blowback from many of her Twitter followers.

“States should always plan for a rainy day just like any business,” Haley wrote. “I disagree that states should take Fed money or be bailed out. This will lead to taxpayers paying for mismanagement of poorly run states. States need to tighten up, make some cuts, and manage.”

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As Haley’s followers pointed out, there are many problems with her argument.

In the first place, many private businesses are being bailed out with government money right now, regardless of whether they had planned “for a rainy day” or not.

Additionally, Haley’s own state of South Carolina is annually one of the biggest beneficiaries of federal largess, as it receives an average of just over $5,000 in federal aid per resident — the 12th-highest per-capita amount of America’s 50 states.

Check out some angry reactions to Haley’s tweet below.

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2020 Election

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