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Trump’s new chief of staff Mark Meadows already facing damaging leaks from White House staffers

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Rep. Mark Meadows

President Donald Trump’s new White House chief of staff is already in hot water after just a couple of weeks on the job.

Mark Meadows, who resigned from Congress in late March to begin work in the White House, quickly pushed out legislative liaison Mike McKenna and then replaced press secretary Stephanie Grisham — and other aides could soon be on their way out, reported Bloomberg.

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The North Carolina Republican has also ruffled feathers by calling Republican governors who have resisted issuing stay-at-home orders and asking them to do so immediately, according to two people familiar with the calls.

The president has said those decisions are the responsibility of individual governors and has not publicly criticized those who held out — all of them Republicans — and it’s not clear whether Meadows had his blessing to make the calls.

Meadows has ratcheted up tensions in a White House known for infighting and frequent turnover, according to multiple sources.

Two sources told Bloomberg that Meadows told Grisham over the weekend that he wanted her to give up the press secretary job and serve only as communications director, but she declined.

Grisham stepped down and returned to her job as first lady Melania Trump’s chief of staff.

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Top aides say they are trying to work with Meadows but complained that he didn’t spend enough time learning how the West Wing works before making changes.

Meadows also pushed out Jessica Ditto, who had worked for Trump since 2016 and was the primary spokeswoman for Ivanka Trump.

One source said aides have gone to Meadows to suggest other staffers to push out, which has raised anxiety and damaged morale.

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2020 Election

Republican ‘hero’ who helped stop terror attack faces questions over ‘affiliations’ to right-wing extremists

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An Oregon congressional candidate who drew worldwide acclaim for helping to stop a terror attack faces questions about his "affiliations" to extremists ahead of Election Day.

Former Oregon National Guardsman Alex Skarlatos, better known as the "Paris train hero" after he and four others subdued a gunman while traveling in Europe in 2015, is running in Oregon's 4th Congressional District. Democratic groups claim that his association with Timber Unity, a group linked to extremist groups such as the Proud Boys, QAnon and the Three Percenter movement, raises "serious questions about his affiliations."

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2020 Election

Morning Joe destroys your Facebook friends’ excuses for voting for Trump

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MSNBC's Joe Scarborough said most of the people he grew up hate President Donald Trump, but they're voting for him anyway.

The "Morning Joe" host said they share many of his concerns about the president and his fitness for office, but he said they always offer excuses for holding their nose and voting to give him four more years.

"It's good talking to them and just saying, so why are you voting for this man?" Scarborough said. "'Well, he's a terrible guy, he's a horrible example for my kids, I'd never invite him over to the house, he's despicable -- I hate him, I just hate him,' but and then, fill in the blank, AOC or Nancy Pelosi or Bernie Sanders or regulations or tax cuts or 401(k)s, and I say, so, well, we have right now a president of the United States who is demanding that his attorney general arrest the former vice president of the United States, his chief political competitor. This is something that happens or happened in the former Soviet Union, this is something that happens still in Russia."

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Mitch McConnell admits he’s been working to sabotage COVID relief talks behind the scenes to prioritize rushing Barrett confirmation

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Senate Majority Mitch McConnell told his Republican colleagues Tuesday that he has privately been urging the Trump White House not to strike a coronavirus relief deal with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi before the November 3 election, warning that an agreement could interfere with the chamber's plan to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court early next week.

McConnell's remarks, first reported by the Washington Post, came during a closed-door Senate GOP lunch just ahead of a Tuesday evening deadline for a relief deal set by Pelosi and agreed to by the Trump administration. While the deadline came and went without a deal, the House Speaker told Democratic lawmakers late Tuesday that the two sides "have been making some progress" and continued to voice optimism that "we can reach an agreement before the election."

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