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GOP sees president’s ‘re-election less certain’ now that voters have seen the real Trump: report

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(AFP / Andrew CABALLERO-REYNOLDS)

According to a report from the Washington Post, Donald Trump, who had hoped to run a campaign on a strong economy before his botching of the coronavirus pandemic led to almost 40 million job losses, is now looking at running a campaign similar to 2016 that was described as “disruptive.”

The Post notes, “Trump’s moves in recent days make clear that the president has decided to revive the disruptive themes of his 2016 bid, aimed at branding his opponent as a corrupt member of the Washington establishment and himself as an insurgent problem-solver. It’s a message that often has seemed incongruent with the present reality as Trump leads the federal government’s response to the worst crisis in a generation,” however, “Trump’s reluctance to recalibrate his political tactics even as the country faces twin health and economic crises could be the gamble that determines his fate in an election less than six months away, according to campaign officials, strategists and pollsters on both sides of the aisle. The approach also stands as a test of whether running again as a disrupter can work in a time of already profound disruption.”

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The problem for Trump this go-around is that the public has watched his performance over the past three and a half years, and what was sold in 2016, may not work this time.

“[Joe Biden pollster John] Anzalone pointed to public polling indicating that Trump’s handling of the coronavirus has cost him significantly with voters, who give the president low marks for his stewardship. Biden has gained ground with suburban voters, independent voters and senior citizens, groups that had previously leaned toward Trump but have drifted away during his presidency, Anzalone said,” the Post reports.

The report notes that the pollster explained that, “… some voters who cast their ballot for a ‘hypothetical Trump’ in 2016 have been disappointed with the real version and will be prime targets for Biden in the coming months. He pointed to senior voters, who have had some of the most dramatic swings away from Trump toward Biden in recent polls.”

“It’s different than voting on the hypothetical Trump — someone who’s going disrupt things and be a change agent,” he elaborated. “That hasn’t gone very well for him, and it is perceived by voters that it hasn’t gone very well for him.”

Republican insiders agree, saying Trump faces an uphill battle as the November election nears.

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“Some Republicans acknowledge that the political landscape has changed since 2016, making Trump’s pathway to reelection less certain,” the Post notes. “Mark Jefferson, executive director of the Wisconsin Republican Party, said Trump’s support is stronger with rural voters than it was in 2016, but ‘we’ve still got work to do in suburban parts of the state.'”

Also hindering the President’s 2020 re-election bid is his inability to hold his widely-covered MAGA rallies.

“The campaign has not had discussions with the state party about having rallies in Wisconsin, Jefferson said, a sign that such events might be a ways off. He said the prospect of not having rallies would be ‘disappointing’ but pointed to the effort by Trump’s team to mount a virtual campaign,” the Post reports. “Some Trump advisers have begun to prepare for the prospect that rallies may not be able to return until just weeks before the election. That level of uncertainty has permeated some of the comments of allies who still favor Trump to win but now acknowledge the unprecedented challenge he faces in vying for a second term at a time of public disruption and hardship.”

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2020 Election

‘Black Voices for Trump’ spokesperson wants to nullify 100,000 Black votes he says were ‘tampered with’

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Paris Dennard, a spokesperson for Black Voices for Trump, on Tuesday suggested that someone "tampered with" the votes of Black Americans in a scheme to steal the election from President Donald Trump.

During an interview on Newsmax, Dennard said that he believes that Trump will overturn the results of the election despite a determination by the General Services Administration (GSA) that Joe Biden is the president elect.

"There's no doubt that if we are able to prove our case in court looking at the states -- Arizona, looking at Georgia, looking at places like Michigan and Pennsylvania -- where we believe that there are irregularities," Dennard opined. "If we can show fraud going forward and toss out illegally cast ballots, ballots that should not have been counted, people that are dead or are not on the roles or if there's anything -- evidence that can be provided about [Dominion Election Systems] and any discrepancies there, it can overturn the certifications in these states and, thus, giving President Trump the win through the legal votes that were cast."

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2020 Election

Conservative fears that Trump-loving conspiracy nuts could hand Democrats the Senate

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Conservative National Review editor Rich Lowry is worried that Trump-loving conspiracy nuts could hand Democrats the Senate during next month's run-off elections in Georgia.

Writing at NRO's "The Corner" blog, Lowry points to recent comments made by President Donald Trump and Trump-backing attorneys Lin Wood and Sidney Powell that attack Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp for following the law and certifying President-elect Joe Biden's win in the Peach State.

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2020 Election

Trump allies relentlessly lobbied election officials in a mad scramble to reverse the president’s loss: report

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On Tuesday, The New York Times podcast "The Daily" looked at how President Donald Trump has — unsuccessfully — tried to use the machinery of state and local government around the country to dismantle

"His team filed a litany of court cases in battleground states. In some, such as Georgia and Michigan, the president and his allies took an even more bullish approach, attempting to use their influence to bear down on election officials, even at the lowest levels of state government," said the report. "They have been relentless and tenacious in the efforts to transform the president’s fortunes. But the results have been immovable: Joe Biden is the president-elect."

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