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Jew-haters protest outside Ohio health director’s home after GOP lawmaker smears her as a ‘globalist’

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For the second time, protesters have gathered in front of the house of Ohio Department of Health director Dr. Amy Acton, with at least one of them carrying an antisemitic sign that referred to Acton’s Jewish faith.

According to Cleveland Jewish News, one woman carried a sign that read, “Jewish Leaders John 7:1,” which refers to a bible verse that reads, “After this, Jesus traveled around Galilee. He wanted to stay out of Judea, where the Jewish leaders were plotting his death.”

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Just days before the protest, Ohio State Rep. Nino Vitale (R) took to his Facebook page and slammed Dr. Acton as a “globalist,” which is a term many agree to be antisemitic in nature.

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“Your basic human rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness do not come from an unelected Globalist Health Director, who signed the order in the dark of night. Your basic human rights are inalienable and cannot be bought, sold, traded or taken from you,” he wrote.

Vitale, who represents Ohio’s 85th District, been a vocal critic of stay-at-home orders and of Acton and Governor Mike DeWine throughout the pandemic. On Monday, he also made headlines for saying that he doesn’t wear a face mask because that’s not what God intended.

James Pasch, ADL regional director in Cleveland, slammed the sign that popped up at Monday’s protest.

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“It is outrageous for anybody to target Dr. Acton for her faith or who she is, and anti-Semitism has no place in the state of Ohio,” he told the Cleveland Jewish News. “Dr. Acton should be applauded for her hard work in trying to save the lives of Ohioans and we call out any anti-Semitic or hateful protests.”


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‘It’s always Republicans’: Conservative bashes his own party’s hostility to democracy

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Conservative David Frum blamed the Republican Party for undermining U.S. democratic institutions.

The former speechwriter for George W. Bush told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" that President Donald Trump's hardcore base was hostile to democracy, and both they and the president pose a real threat to constitutional law even if he loses in November.

"I think he'll issue a spate of pardons to his intimates, relatives and to himself," Frum warned, if Trump loses the election. "We've never had to test the question, whether a president can pardon himself. I imagine, I expect that we will be testing that question."

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These psychological motives have shaped right-wing conservatism in America ever since the Civil War

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Many people who see little rational basis for supporting Donald Trump ask themselves: Why is he so popular?  Relatedly, why did so many people support Richard Nixon, Adolf Hitler, and other avatars of popular right-wing conservatism?  There are, of course, many different reasons for each situation.  But there also key commonalities that have been identified in meta-analyses of the topic written by the psychologist John T. Jost and colleagues.  In relation to Jost’s work, I have examined aspects of the antebellum South in order to better understand its political culture, especially aspects of that culture that prompted many Southerners to become more emotionally receptive to the appeals of “fire-eater” secessionist conservatives.  More broadly, this historical lens can help illuminate the mass appeal of conservatism in general, focusing particularly on the psychological factors that tend to underlie this appeal.

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Big Pharma ignored EU’s plea in 2017 to fast-track virus vaccines prior to pandemics: report

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According to a report from The Guardian, major pharmaceutical companies threw up roadblocks to a plan by the European Union to push forward with a major vaccine research effort well before pandemics hit.

The report notes that back in 2017, the EU's executive branch pushed a proposal to put the development of vaccines on the fast-track only to have major drugmakers reject the suggestion.

"The commission’s argument had been that the research could 'facilitate the development and regulatory approval of vaccines against priority pathogens, to the extent possible before an actual outbreak occurs'. The pharmaceutical companies on the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), however, did not take up the idea," the report states.

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