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Colbert names Trump’s siege on DC the ‘Tinyman Square’ incident

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It wasn’t quite Tiananmen Square, where a still-unknown number of Chinese protesters were murdered by the government in 1989, but it was the closest thing President Donald Trump managed to score this week.

After watching the footage of the military tear gas, beat and shoot at protesters so Trump could march from the presidential bunker to St. John’s Church for the cameras.

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“It was like Tiananmen Square,” Colbert deemed. “Except, in Trump’s case, Tinyman Square.”

Trump claimed on “The Fox & Friends” that no one was tear-gassed, so it’s unclear what was stinging people’s eyes and making them cough, choke and tear up. The Park Police released a statement saying it wasn’t tear gas. While the moment was captured on video from dozens of different camera angles, one protester actually grabbed a canister of Oleoresins Capiscum, or “OC,” the gas that was used.

The company that makes it, Defense Technology, lists on its website that “is widely used as a crowd management tool for the rapid and broad deployment of chemical agent.”

It causes the same tears and suffocation that tear gas does. So instead of it being tear gas, it was just a toxic chemical that causes tears.

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It was all in response to reports that claimed Trump spent the night in the White House bunker because he was so scared of the unarmed teenagers, students and hippies chanting in the streets. Trump told Fox’s Brian Kilmeade he just went down to “inspect” the bunker.

“That is an all-time great excuse,” said Colbert. “So, he was just checking to make sure the bunker was okay. ‘I didn’t poop my pants. I just ran diagnostics on my boxers to see if they were load-bearing. They are.'”

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Watch Colbert’s opener below:


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‘The president isn’t above the law’: Supreme Court expected to rule on two key Trump cases on Thursday

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Can Donald Trump refuse to hand over his financial records to Congress and New York prosecutors simply because he is president of the United States? The Supreme Court will rule Thursday on two related cases to answer this, with potentially widespread political implications.

The decision by the nine justices could lift the veil on Trump's finances ahead of the November 3 election.

Unlike all of his predecessors since Richard Nixon in the 1970s, New York real estate mogul Trump refused to release his tax returns, despite promising to do so during his 2016 White House campaign.

Trump made his fortune a key component of that campaign, and his lack of transparency raises questions about his true worth and possible conflicts of interest.

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2020 Election

Houston convention center operator cancels in-person Texas GOP meeting

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The Republican Party of Texas' in-person convention next week has been canceled, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner said Wednesday.

The news came after Turner directed the city's legal department to work with the Houston First Corp., which operates the George R. Brown Convention Center, to review the contract with the state party.

Turner said officials with Houston First sent a letter this afternoon to the State Republican Executive Committee, the state party's governing board, canceling the gathering, which was set to happen July 16-18 and was expected to draw roughly 6,000 attendees.

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This government official tried to share optimism about vaccines — but he also hinted at a dark possible future

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Dr. Kayvon Modjarrad, the director for Emerging Infectious Diseases at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, joined CNN's Anderson Cooper for a recent TV interview to discuss the ongoing work to create a vaccine for the coronavirus. And in many ways, his remarks brought good news about the development process and progress toward a safe and effective vaccine. But he also hinted at a dark potential future for the virus, a consideration that has not yet received much public discussion.

"I am very optimistic that we will have a vaccine in the near future, a safe vaccine," he said. "How effective that vaccine will be — time will tell. And I don't think there's going to be just one vaccine. There'll be multiple vaccines that we try to get across the finish line, as quickly as possible. And we may need multiple interactions of the vaccine going forward, season to season."

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