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Mayor urged to resign after ‘political terrorism’ against police reform activists: ‘Intimidation pure and simple’

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The mayor of St. Louis, Missouri was harshly criticized on Friday for reading the names and addresses of constituents who want to defund the police and invest the savings in social programs.

“St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson took some time out from a public briefing on COVID-19 Friday to read aloud the full names and addresses of several of her own constituents who are calling for police reform,” the Riverfront Times reported Friday. “The briefing was aired publicly on Facebook Live, and a recording was online for about three hours before it was deleted.”

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The publication, “counted at least ten instances wherein Krewson read aloud an activist’s full name and the name of the street on which they reside. At one point in time she lists a person’s full name and full street address, remarking, ‘He lives around the corner from me.'”

The mayor received harsh criticism for the move.

“So not cool to doxx my constituents who support #DefundThePolice on your FB live today. It’s a move designed to silence dissent, and it’s dangerous,” warned Aldermember Megan Ellyia Green, who added the hashtag #DoBetter.

Cop Watch STL also blasted the move, saying, “she just put a hit out on people. This is a sick and twisted abuse of power and political terrorism.”

The ACLU of Missouri said it was “shocking and misguided.”

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“This was intimidation pure and simple,” the ACLU said in a statement.

Late Friday evening, the mayor apologized.

“Never did I intend to harm anyone or cause distress,” the mayor claimed. “The update is removed and again, I apologize.”

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Here’s some of what people were saying about the incident:

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https://twitter.com/MeganEllyia/status/1276715986687791104

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