Quantcast
Connect with us

New York’s Broadway closed until at least January

Published

on

New York’s iconic Broadway theater district will stay closed through the end of the year, its trade association said Monday, due to the unpredictability of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Broadway League did not set a date for performances to resume, but is offering refunds and exchanges for tickets purchased for all shows through January 3, 2021.

The association said plans to safely re-open New York’s most bankable tourist attraction were being developed, including on screening and testing showgoers, along with cleaning and sanitizing protocols.

ADVERTISEMENT

Reopening the arts and entertainment sectors, a major feature of life in New York, technically is in the final phase of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s four-part plan to return economic and cultural activity to the state.

Plays and musicals are considered mass gatherings, likely the last facet of pre-coronavirus life to reopen.

The Broadway League projected that performances could resume in early 2021 “over a series of rolling dates” to end its longest shutdown in history.

“The alchemy of 1,000 strangers bonding into a single audience fueling each performer on stage and behind the scenes will be possible again when Broadway theaters can safely host full houses,” Thomas Schumacher, chairman of the board of The Broadway League, said in a statement.

“The safety of our cast, crew, orchestra and audience is our highest priority and we look forward to returning to our stages only when it’s safe to do so,” he added.

ADVERTISEMENT

– Social distancing impossible –

Along with virtually all events in the city, Broadway’s theaters shut in mid-March, when 31 productions were running and eight were in rehearsals with spring opening dates.

Broadway’s closure is a major blow: in normal times, those theaters would be raking in $33 million a week in ticket sales.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Frozen” — a show based on Disney’s blockbuster hit movie — has already said it would remain permanently closed.

According to Broadway World, “Frozen” brought in some $155 million at the box office and was seen by more than 1.35 million viewers.

ADVERTISEMENT

The plays “Hangmen” — which had not yet opened — and “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” also announced their closures, though they were both more limited productions than a musical.

Playing before empty stadiums, or before severely reduced crowds, simply wouldn’t work for Broadway, professionals say.

“The financial model for Broadway is such that social distancing just won’t work,” Charlotte St. Martin, president of the Broadway League, said in May.

ADVERTISEMENT

“A show could not maintain its bills even with houses that were 50 percent or less occupied.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump has now predicted COVID will ‘go away’ in each of the last seven months

Published

on

President Donald Trump on Wednesday told "Fox & Friends" that the novel coronavirus "will go away, like things go away."

As Democratic political operative Daniel Wessel notes on Twitter, this is not the first time the president has made bold declarations about the virus disappearing.

Back in February, Trump said the virus "miraculously goes away," then said in March that "it'll go away," and then in April declared that "it's going away."

Continue Reading

COVID-19

A third of Afghans estimated to have contracted virus: health ministry

Published

on

Nearly a third of Afghanistan's population -- or 10 million people -- has been infected with the coronavirus, according to health ministry estimates published Wednesday.

The figure comes from a survey based on antibody tests on around 9,500 people across the country, with technical support from the World Health Organization, health minister Ahmad Jawad Osmani said at a press briefing.

The survey estimated that 31.5 percent of the population had contracted the virus, with the highest infection rate in Kabul where more than half of the city's five million population were thought to have been infected.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Watchdog demands to know if this key drug maker is sitting on possible COVID-19 treatment

Published

on

"It is sadly predictable that Big Pharma responds to a global pandemic by trying to bring to market only those drugs that maximize its profits."

As Covid-19 cases and deaths continue an upward trajectory in the United States, a watchdog group and allied scientists Tuesday urged the federal government and Gilead, the maker of the promising drug remdesivir, to explain why they have not pursued a similar treatment that might be cheaper for consumers though possibly less profitable to the company.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image