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San Jose cops rupture testicle of their own bias trainer in violent response to protests

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Derrick Sanderlin and Cayla Derrick Sanderlin (KGO)

California police maimed one of their own trainers as he tried to intervene in an outbreak of violence during nationwide protests against police brutality.

Derrick Sanderlin has for years trained San Jose police recruits how to avoid implicit bias against racial minorities, but the 27-year-old was shot in the groin by a rubber bullet fired by one of the department’s officers — causing his testicle to rupture, reported KGO-TV.

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“The doctor said there was a possibility I could be sterile due to the ruptured testicle,” Sanderlin said. “He said they saved everything, but won’t know for sure until we try to have kids. I was terrified out of my mind. Maybe a week before the protests, my wife and I were talking about how maybe in a year, we’ll have saved up enough to think about having kids.”

The 27-year-old Sanderlin, a community activist and head of the faith-based People Acting in Community Together, stopped a demonstrator May 29 from smashing the window of a car with his skateboard, allowing the driver to get away as protesters shut down Highway 101.

The driver had a “Blue Lives Matter” license plate frame, which he later admitted to displaying to get out of speeding tickets and not in support of police.

Sanderlin then headed over to City Hall, where he saw officers shooting rubber bullets at protesters — and he again intervened.

“I really just couldn’t watch it anymore,” Sanderlin said, “and just kind of made like a parallel walkover, put my hands up, and just stood in the line of the fire and asked them to please not do this.”

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Video shows Sanderlin standing about 10 to 15 feet away from police with his hands raised, but officers shot him anyway with less-lethal bullets.

“I stepped into the line of fire, and a couple of cops said, ‘Move,’” Sanderlin recalled. “I said, with my hands up, ‘I can’t do that, please don’t do this.’ Another cop came up behind them, pointed directly at me, and said, ‘Move.’”

“He fired off a rubber bullet, and I realized he wasn’t aiming for my chest,” he added. “I was hit directly in the groin.”

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Sanderlin’s attorney Sarah Marinho said her client had done nothing to warrant the use of force, and she believes the officer violated regulations against firing rubber bullets at a person’s head or groin.

“He’s so close, it’s hard to believe they weren’t aiming for his groin,” Marinho said. “At no distance is it safe to aim for the groin.”

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San Jose police Chief Eddie Garcia said he had spoken to Sanderlin, whom he praised as a “real leader,” but defended the use of force.

However, protesters and civil rights groups say police instigated the violence, pointing to Sanderlin’s wounding and video of Officer Jared Yuen taunting demonstrators before shooting rubber bullets at a man who had previously helped police during the unrest.

Police are reviewing the department’s use of force and investigating individual events, officials said, and Mayor Sam Liccardo proposed a ban on rubber bullets.

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Sanderlin felt let down by the police department and its leadership.

“It just flew in the face of everything we had talked about with the police chief, and what we tried as community members to instill in the new officers that have come in,” he said. “That really makes me sad.”

“The community was not prepared for war,” Sanderlin added. “They were prepared for their voices to be heard.”

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Moon may be richer in water than thought — and it could help propel humans farther from earth

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There may be far more water on the Moon than previously thought, according to two studies published Monday raising the tantalising prospect that astronauts on future space missions could find refreshment -- and maybe even fuel -- on the lunar surface.

The Moon was believed to be bone dry until around a decade ago when a series of findings suggested that our nearest celestial neighbour has traces of water trapped in the surface.

Two new studies published in Nature Astronomy on Monday suggest there could be much more water than previously thought, including ice stored in permanently shadowed "cold traps" at lunar polar regions.

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Asymptomatic coronaagvirus sufferers lose antibodies sooner: study

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Asymptomatic coronavirus sufferers appear to lose detectable antibodies sooner than people who have exhibited Covid-19 symptoms, according to one of the biggest studies of its kind in Britain published on Tuesday.

The findings by Imperial College London and market research firm Ipsos Mori also suggest the loss of antibodies was slower in 18–24 year-olds compared to those aged 75 and over.

Overall, samples from hundreds of thousands of people across England between mid-June and late September showed the prevalence of virus antibodies fell by more than a quarter.

The research, commissioned by the British government and published Tuesday by Imperial, indicates people's immune response to Covid-19 reduces over time following infection.

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2020 Election

Early voting to be hit by heavy rain and flooding as Hurricane Zeta barrels towards the Gulf Coast

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Hurricane Zeta is expected to make landfall near Louisiana's border with Mississippi on Wednesday evening as campaigns work to get supporters to the polls and convince any undecided voters to back their candidate.

"Hurricane conditions and life-threatening storm surge are possible along portions of the northern Gulf Coast on Wednesday, and Storm Surge and Hurricane Watches are in effect," the National Hurricane Center warned.

"Between Tuesday night and Thursday, heavy rainfall is expected from portions of the central Gulf Coast into the southern Appalachians and Mid-Atlantic states near and in advance of Zeta. This rainfall will lead to flash, urban, small stream, and minor river flooding," the center explained.

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