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Trump threatens to cut off funding for schools that disobey his order to reopen during surging pandemic

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President Donald Trump explicitly politicized the reopening of schools during the coronavirus pandemic.

Many parents are apprehensive about sending their children back to school as the virus continues to surge in many areas, and schools, colleges and universities are scrambling to match up student needs with safety concerns, logistical realities and political pressure.

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“In Germany, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and many other countries, SCHOOLS ARE OPEN WITH NO PROBLEMS,” Trump tweeted. “The Dems think it would be bad for them politically if U.S. schools open before the November Election, but is important for the children & families. May cut off funding if not open!”

Each European nation cited in the president’s tweet has experienced different outcomes in their schools during the pandemic.

The proportion of coronavirus infections among children under 19 increased in Germany from about 10 percent in early May, when schools reopened, to about 20 percent in late June, despite some mask requirements.

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Mask wearing is optional in Denmark, where cases have continued to decline since day care centers and elementary schools reopened in mid-April, but schools have restricted children to small groups at recess and held classes outdoors whenever possible.

Sweden never closed its schools during the pandemic and does not require students to wear masks, and several teachers have died from COVID-19.

Trump, on the other hand, threatened to interfere with his own health experts’ guidelines for safely reopening schools.

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He later attacked the Centers of Disease Control over their school reopening guidelines:

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Ron DeSantis admits GOP sabotaged unemployment with ‘pointless roadblocks’ so fewer people would sign up

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In an interview with CBS4 Miami's Jim DeFede, Gov. Ron DeSantis (R-FL) admitted that Florida Republicans, led by his predecessor, deliberately crippled the state's unemployment system so that fewer out-of-work people would apply for benefits.

"Do you believe that the system was in part put together the way it was to discourage people from being able to collect unemployment?" asked DeFede.

"I think that was the animating philosophy," said DeSantis. "I mean having studied how it was internally constructed, I think the goal was for whoever designed, it was, ‘Let’s put as many kind of pointless roadblocks along the way, so people just say, oh, the hell with it, I’m not going to do that.’ And, you know, for me, let’s decide on what the benefit is and let’s get it out as efficiently as possible. You know, we shouldn’t necessarily do these roadblocks to do it. So we have cleared a lot of those."

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2020 Election

Here’s what white women in a swing county of a swing state think of Donald Trump

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Originally published by The 19th

It is no secret to the campaigns of Joe Biden and Donald Trump that the road to the White House runs through places like Michigan’s Macomb County.

It is a swing county in one of a trio of recently reliably Democratic states — Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin — that shocked Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign by breaking for Trump after backing Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012.

The county, a suburban and exurban area north of Detroit, is the state’s third most populous. Eighty percent of its residents are White. Roughly a quarter of adults have college degrees. The median household income in 2018 was about $60,000. Voters there cast ballots at higher rates than the country overall. It is a so-called bellwether that backed the candidate elected president all but three times in the past 50 years. 

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2020 Election

America only has two weeks to fix voting by mail before November election: report

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On Wednesday, according to NBC News, election law expert and Stanford University professor Nate Persily warned that America needs to create a plan for streamlining and safeguarding the mail-in voting system within two weeks — or it could spell disaster for the November election.

"I think we have two weeks to make the critical decisions that are necessary to pull off this election," Persily told NBC.

The worry is that many states will see a repeat of the problems in New York's primary. New York has traditionally restricted access to mail-in voting, scaled it up rapidly in order to protect people from the coronavirus pandemic, and the result was chaos as confused postal and election officials scrambled to process everything. Six weeks later, many races still haven't been certified, and a federal judge ruled that ballots in one congressional race were improperly invalidated and more must be counted.

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