Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump’s ‘kinship’ with white nationalism informs his entire policy agenda: columnist

Published

on

On Tuesday, writing for Vox, Sean Collins outlined how President Donald Trump has geared his presidency to form a “symbiotic relationship” with white nationalists.

Trump signaled his affinity for white nationalism early on by bringing Steve Bannon and Stephen Miller into his administration — the former of whom left, the latter of whom stayed and is still creating strategy. He has also given them a number of nods in his rhetoric, most notably when he said that there were “very fine people” among the neo-Nazi demonstrators in Charlottesville.

ADVERTISEMENT

But, Collins wrote, these elements are just the beginning.

“Trump has given an overt platform to white nationalists in a way that is unprecedented in the modern political era,” wrote Collins. “The issue isn’t just Trump’s rhetoric. His administration’s immigration policy has led to the separation of families, to children facing risk of exposure to disease like Covid-19 in detention facilities, and to the deaths of immigrants seeking asylum in the US. His criminal justice policy has led to a more punitive criminal justice system and to the weakening of police oversight, all of which disproportionately affect communities of color.”

“His economic policies have rewarded those already holding wealth (a mostly white group), and his much-vaunted ‘greatest economy’ was not as great for people of color — particularly Black Americans, whose unemployment rate has been at least 2 percentage points higher than the general unemployment rate for the entirety of Trump’s tenure,” wrote Collins. “In fact, a kinship with white nationalist ideas can be found in just about any part of the Trump administration’s policy, from health care to foreign affairs.”

You can read more here.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump says there’s been ‘confusion’ — but urges supporters to mask up: ‘We have nothing to lose’

Published

on

After months of casting doubt about wearing masks, President Donald Trump on Monday emailed his supporters about the "confusion" on the subject.

"We are all in this together, and while I know there has been some confusion surrounding the usage of face masks, I think it's something we should all try to do when we are not able to be socially distanced from others," Trump wrote in the email, that was posted online by multiple journalists.

I don't love wearing them either. Masks may be good, they may be just okay, or they may be great," the email read.

In the email, Trump referred to COVID-19 as "the China Virus."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Here’s why the coronavirus spike is especially devastating to rural communities

Published

on

The first coronavirus hot spots in the country were densely-populated cities with international ports of entry, like New York City, San Francisco, and Seattle.

But the virus has now penetrated deep into rural areas around the country. And according to Politico, a new study has shed light on the catastrophic problems this has created for rural communities: more than half of U.S. rural communities have no ICU beds, forcing hospitals to transfer patients far away to other facilities that can accommodate severe COVID-19 cases.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Joy Reid medical expert blasts the president’s lies on coronavirus: ‘Trump needs to stay in his lane’

Published

on

MSNBC anchor Joy Reid interviewed Dr. Bernard B. Ashby about the latest coming from the White House on the coronavirus pandemic.

"If, for instance, you did not test for pregnancy, does it mean you are not pregnant?" Reid asked.

Ashby, a cardiologist from Miami, praised the anchor on her new primetime show, "The ReidOut," but did not directly answer the question.

"And in terms of the whole discourse, the fact that I'm having to respond to Trump about clinical medicine is ridiculous," Dr. Ashby explained.

"Trump needs to stay in his lane. Like, we went to medical school for a long time, we did training for a long time to speak on exactly what ... we have the expertise to speak on and the fact that Trump is asserting himself in academic medicine, into clinical medicine is ridiculous," he explained.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image