Quantcast
Connect with us

US ‘looking at’ banning TikTok and other Chinese apps: Pompeo

Published

on

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has said the US is “looking at” banning Chinese social media apps, including TikTok, over allegations Beijing is using them to spy on users.

India has already barred the wildly popular TikTok app over national security and privacy concerns while other countries are reportedly mulling similar measures.

Asked on Monday by Fox News’s Laura Ingraham if the US should consider blocking the apps — “especially Tik Tok” — the country’s top diplomat said the Trump administration was “taking this very seriously; we are certainly looking at it.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Pompeo said the US had been working for a “long time” on the “problems” of Chinese technology in infrastructure and was “making real progress.”

“With respect to Chinese apps on people’s cell phones, I can assure you the United States will get this one right too,” he said.

“I don’t want to get out in front of the president, but it’s something we are looking at.”

Pompeo earlier lashed out at what he called China’s “Orwellian” moves to censor activists, schools and libraries in Hong Kong under a sweeping new security law.

Authorities in the financial hub have ordered schools to remove books for review under the law, which has criminalized certain opinions such as calls for independence or more autonomy.

ADVERTISEMENT

Libraries in Hong Kong said they were pulling titles written by a handful of pro-democracy activists.

“The Chinese Communist Party’s destruction of free Hong Kong continues,” Pompeo said in a sharply worded statement.

“With the ink barely dry on the repressive National Security Law, local authorities — in an Orwellian move — have now established a central government national security office, started removing books critical of the CCP from library shelves, banned political slogans, and are now requiring schools to enforce censorship,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Pompeo condemned what he called the “latest assaults on the rights and freedoms of the people of Hong Kong.”

“Until now, Hong Kong flourished because it allowed free thinking and free speech, under an independent rule of law. No more,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Beijing has faced a groundswell of criticism from primarily Western nations over its decision to impose the security law, which outlaws acts of subversion, secession, terrorism and colluding with foreign forces.

US Vice President Mike Pence told CNBC last week that the law was a “betrayal” and “unacceptable to freedom-loving people around the world.”

Last week the US Congress passed tough new sanctions targeting banks involved in violating Hong Kong’s autonomy.

ADVERTISEMENT

The act would punish banks — including by blocking loans from US institutions — if they conduct “significant transactions” with officials who violate the city’s autonomy.

President Donald Trump must sign the legislation for it to take effect.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Nobel economist says he’s done the math — and the risk Trump and McConnell pose to the economy is ‘terrifying’

Published

on

Very much a student of New Deal economics, New York Times columnist Paul Krugman has often stressed that helping the unemployed during an economic downturn not only helps those who are out of work — it also benefits the economy on the whole. Krugman made that point many times during the Great Recession, and in a column published this week, the liberal economist warns that the “coronavirus recession of 2020” will become even worse if unemployed Americans don’t receive the help that they need.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘Friday Night Massacre’ at US Postal Service as Postmaster General—a major Trump donor—ousts top officials

Published

on

Government watchdogs, Democratic lawmakers, and pro-democracy advocates declared it a "Friday Night Massacre" for the U.S. Postal Service after news broke in a classic end-of-the-week dump that Louis DeJoy—a major GOP donor to President Donald Trump and the recently appointed Postmaster General—had issued a sweeping overhaul of the agency, including the ouster of top executives from key posts and the reshuffling of more than two dozen other officials and operational managers.

According to the Washington Post:

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

‘Gullible’ Trump administration paid up to $500 million too much for these ventilators: investigators

Published

on

Citing “evidence of fraud, waste, and abuse,” a congressional subcommittee investigating the federal government’s purchase of $646.7 million worth of Philips ventilators has asked the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General to launch its own investigation of the deal.

The House subcommittee launched its review after ProPublica stories in March and April showed how a U.S. subsidiary of Royal Philips N.V. received millions in federal tax dollars years ago to develop a low-cost ventilator for pandemics but didn’t deliver it. Instead, as the coronavirus began spreading around the globe and U.S. hospitals were desperate for more, Philips was selling commercial versions of the government-funded ventilator overseas from its Pennsylvania factory. Then in April, despite having not fulfilled the initial contract, the Dutch company struck a much more lucrative deal to sell the government 43,000 ventilators for four times the price.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image