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WATCH: Fauci laughs as Republican Jim Jordan attempts to get him to call for banning protests

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Rep. Jim Jordan clashed with Dr. Anthony Fauci on Friday during a House hearing about the current status of White House efforts to stem the coronavirus pandemic. The confrontation resulted in the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases smiling and laughing at the Ohio Republican as he tried to drag the doctor into a political debate about Black Lives Matter protesters.

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Jordan came right out of chute ranting about protests and trying to get the doctor to call for the halting of public protests — something Fauci said was not his call.

“Dr. Fauci, do protests increase the spread of the virus?” Jordan pressed. “Half a million protesters on June 6th alone, I’m asking that number of people, does it increase the spread of the virus?”

“Crowding together particularly when you’re not wearing a mask contributes to the spread of the virus,” the doctor carefully replied.

“Should we limit the protesting?” Jordan persisted.

“I’m not sure what you mean should — how do we say limit the protesting? I don’t think that’s relevant,” the doctor replied.

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“Well, you just said if it increases the spread of the virus, I’m asking should we limit it?” the Republican asked.

“Well, I’m not in a position what a government can do in a forceful way,” Fauci advised,

That was when Jordan went off on a rant, loudly asserting, “You make all kind of recommendations. You made comments on dating and baseball and everything you can imagine. You just said protests increase the spread — should we try to limit the protest?”

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“No, I think I would leave that to people who are more in a position to do that,” Fauci replied while beginning to smile and look from side to side as Jordan went off on a rant about churches being forced to close, finally answering the congressman and telling him, “I’m not favoring of anybody over anybody. I’m just making a statement that’s a broad statement that avoid crowds of any type no matter where you are because that leads to the acquisition and transmission, and I don’t judge one crowd versus another crowd. when you’re in a crowd, particularly if you’re not wearing a mask.”

Watch below:

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2020 Election

US Rep. Dan Crenshaw calls expanding mail-in voting ‘playing with fire’ despite rarity of voter fraud

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U.S. Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Houston, doubled down on the claim that expanding voting by mail is not secure, saying it was like “playing with fire” in a conversation that aired Monday as part of the 2020 Texas Tribune Festival.

Republicans and President Donald Trump have repeatedly tried to sow doubt over the reliability of voting by mail, alleging it allows for widespread fraud.

During the interview with Politico’s Tim Alberta, Crenshaw raised concerns about voting practices in Pennsylvania and Nevada, falsely saying that Pennsylvania was sending unsolicited ballots to voters.

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2020 Election

These Florida Cuban-American voters are flipping their support from Trump to Biden: ‘I know what a dictator looks like’

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In recent weeks, there has been a great deal of reporting on President Donald Trump’s efforts to make inroads with Latino voters. But it’s important to note where most of those inroads have been made: Trump has generally fared much better among Cuban-Americans in Florida than among Mexican-Americans in western states or Puerto Ricans in New York City, Boston and Philadelphia. And journalist David Smiley, in an article published in the Miami Herald on September 21, stresses that Trump’s support among Cuban-Americans is by no means universal.

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2020 Election

Younger voters are most likely to have their absentee ballots rejected — here’s why

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As half or more of the 2020 presidential election's votes will be cast on mailed-out ballots, a new study on why absentee ballots were rejected in three urban California counties in 2018 reveals why young voters' ballots were rejected at triple the rate of all voters.

Nationally, it is well known that absentee ballots arriving after state deadlines, problems with a voter's signature on the return envelope not matching their voter registration, or a missing signature account for more than half of all rejected ballots, as the latest federal statistics affirm. But a new California Voter Foundation (CVF) study reveals the most likely causes behind those errors, especially for young voters.

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