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Trump allies privately concerned Kanye West’s campaign will hurt the president more than Biden

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FILE PHOTO: U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and musician Kanye West at Trump Tower in New York City on Dec 13, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly/File Photo

Kanye West’s unexpected presidential campaign is being boosted by Republican operatives and could siphon off votes from Joe Biden in key battleground states, but some of President Donald Trump’s allies are wary of the rapper.

Some Trump advisers privately admit there’s not much evidence to show West could peel off support from Biden, and they’re worried the mentally precarious musician’s foray into politics could backfire, reported The Daily Beast.

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“I think it’s good that [Kanye’s] voice gets out there,” Trump told Fox News host Geraldo Rivera. “I actually think it’s fine.”

West has voiced his support for Trump and maintained a close relationship with Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and senior adviser, and many White House allies think his campaign could hurt Biden in battleground states.

“Of course it’s a good idea,” said Stuart Jolly, Trump’s national field director in 2016. “The margins were small in states like Wisconsin [which Trump won] in 2016. Who knows how small they’re going to be this time around? If you’re a [Republican operative] who wants the president to win, more power to them.”

But others are concerned about West’s mental health, and seven GOP sources told The Daily Beast they’re concerned the stunt could hurt the president one way or another.

“[It] could siphon from Trump Blacks who don’t like Biden,” said John McLaughlin, a top Trump pollster. “Blacks who don’t like Biden in a two-way race would vote for the president. Now they might consider Kanye.”

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2020 Election

REVEALED: Trump to announce billions in aid to Puerto Rico in desperate attempt to win Florida

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President Donald Trump on Friday will announce a multi-billion dollar federal aid package for Puerto Rico, with most of the funds to be used to rebuild the U.S. territory's power grid, devastated by hurricanes that attack the island every year.

The desperately needed assistance comes after Trump has spent his entire tenure in office attacking Puerto Rico, its leaders, and complaining repeatedly about congressionally-approved funds for the overlooked island. Recently it was revealed he wanted to sell Puerto Rico, after the 2017 Hurricane Maria that took the lives of 3059 people, and did nearly $92 billion in damage.

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2020 Election

Black voters in North Carolina are seeing their mail-in ballots rejected 4 times more than white voters

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Early voting has started in North Carolina, and many Black voters in the state are already seeing their mail-in ballots getting rejected at a higher rate than white voters.

FiveThirtyEight's Kaleigh Rogers reports that "Black voters’ ballots are being rejected at more than four times the rate of white voters" in North Carolina as of September 17th.

In total, Black voters have seen 642 of the 13,747 ballots cast rejected, a rejection rate of 4.7 percent. White voters, in contrast, have seen 681 out of 60,954 ballots cast rejected, which is a rejection rate of 1.1 percent.

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2020 Election

‘Loony’ Bill Barr is the ‘second most dangerous man in America’: WaPo columnist Eugene Robinson

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Discussing comments made by Bill Barr this past week on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" on Friday morning, Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson called the attorney general "loony" after calling the AG the "second most dangerous man in America."

With host Joe Scarborough pointing out that Donald Trump attacked his own FBI director again this week, Robinson was asked to explain what is going on with the Justice Department.

"Historically, obviously, as you know, and as everyone knows, the FBI director is given an amount of autonomy and authority to do what he needs to do in the service of American justice and is thought to be immune from the sort of political interference," he began. "At least that's the theory, that was what we tried to do from the end of J. Edgar Hoover's tenure to now and it started at the beginning of Donald Trump's term when he got rid of Jim Comey because he wouldn't do his political bidding. So this is nothing new for Donald Trump."

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