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Bill Barr slapped down for spreading ‘impossible’ vote-by-mail conspiracy theory

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Attorney General Bill Barr has been spreading a new conspiracy theory about mail-in voting that experts are saying would be nearly “impossible” to pull off.

As Bloomberg reports, Barr has repeatedly floated an idea that foreign countries will try to alter the results of the 2020 election by sending out counterfeit ballots en masse to American households.

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However, elections experts say that the difficulties in mass producing counterfeit ballots for every individual county in America on a nationwide scale would make enacting such a scheme a massive logistical headache for any foreign country.

“You would basically have to reproduce the entire election administration infrastructure atom-for-atom in the middle of Siberia in order to have any chance of doing that,” Charles Stewart III, an elections scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, tells Bloomberg.

In addition to needing county-by-county knowledge of each ballot, Bloomberg notes that a foreign saboteur would also need to reproduce “the unique printing on the correct type of paper for scanners programmed to read that ballot,” as well as “the bar codes and signature on envelopes used to identify each voter.”

And that all assumes that the would-be saboteurs sent out ballots to voters who wouldn’t be flagged for potential double voting.

“If I just printed 10,000 ballots and took them over to the county to try to get them to tabulate them, they’re going to have a sheriff on top me in a heartbeat,” said Jeff Ellington, president of Arizona-based Runbeck Election Services Inc.

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Does wildfire smoke cause long-term harm? Here’s what we know

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SEELEY LAKE, Mont. — When researchers arrived in this town tucked in the Northern Rockies three years ago, they could still smell the smoke a day after it cleared from devastating wildfires. Their plan was to chart how long it took for people to recover from living for seven weeks surrounded by relentless smoke.

They still don’t know, because most residents haven’t recovered. In fact, they’ve gotten worse.

Forest fires had funneled hazardous air into Seeley Lake, a town of fewer than 2,000 people, for 49 days. The air quality was so bad that on some days the monitoring stations couldn’t measure the extent of the pollution. The intensity of the smoke and the length of time residents had been trapped in it were unprecedented, prompting county officials to issue their first evacuation orders due to smoke, not fire risk.

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2020 Election

Election gift for Florida? Trump poised to approve drug imports from Canada

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Over the objections of drugmakers, the Trump administration is expected within weeks to finalize its plan that would allow states to import some prescription medicines from Canada.

Six states — Colorado, Florida, Maine, New Hampshire, New Mexico and Vermont — have passed laws allowing them to seek federal approval to buy drugs from Canada to give their residents access to lower-cost medicines.

But industry observers say the drug importation proposal under review by the administration is squarely aimed at Florida — the most populous swing state in the November election. Trump’s support of the idea initially came at the urging of Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a close Republican ally.

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Trump treated the coronavirus pandemic like a reality TV show — now it’s blowing up in his face

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It's hardly new or revelatory to say this, but it's critical to remember the role that "The Apprentice" played in turning Donald Trump, a notoriously bad businessman with a string of bankruptcies, into an American icon of capitalist success. Everything from careful editing to set designers giving the dreary Trump Organization offices a glow-up came together to create the illusion of success where only failure and mediocrity had been before.

This article was originally published at Salon

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