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McConnell told GOP donors that replacing RBG would be their ‘October Surprise’: report

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Sen. Mitch McConnell, photo by Gage Skidmore

In April, The New Yorker published a blockbuster profile of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

The story, by Jane Mayer, was titled, “How Mitch McConnell became Trump’s enabler-in-chief.”

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/04/20/how-mitch-mcconnell-became-trumps-enabler-in-chief

“The most famous example of McConnell’s obstructionism was his audacious refusal to allow a hearing on Merrick Garland, whom Obama nominated for the Supreme Court, in 2016. When Justice Antonin Scalia unexpectedly died, vacating the seat, there were three hundred and forty-two days left in Obama’s second term. But McConnell argued that ‘the American people’ should decide who should fill the seat in the next election, ignoring the fact that the American people had elected Obama,” Mayer wrote.

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“As a young lawyer, McConnell had argued in an academic journal that politics should play no part in Supreme Court picks; the only thing that mattered was if the nominee was professionally qualified. In 2016, though, he said it made no difference how qualified Garland, a highly respected moderate judge, was,” she explained. “Before then, the Senate had never declined to consider a nominee simply because it was an election year. On the contrary, the Senate had previously confirmed seventeen Supreme Court nominees during election years and rejected two. Nevertheless, McConnell prevailed.”

Mayer interviewed a former Trump White House official.

“McConnell’s telling our donors that when R.B.G. meets her reward, even if it’s October, we’re getting our judge. He’s saying it’s our October Surprise,” the former Trump official revealed.


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2020 Election

‘Expand the court’: Ocasio-Cortez leads charge with 3-word Democratic strategy after Barrett sworn in

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez had just three initial words to say Monday night after Amy Coney Barrett was sworn in as the latest Associate Justice to the U.S. Supreme Court following her confirmation by a 52 to 48 margin in the Republican-controlled U.S. Senate earlier in the evening.

"Expand the court," tweeted Ocasio-Cortez, a sentiment widely shared as the only just recourse after the GOP under President Donald Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell rammed through the third justice for the nation's highest court in less than four years.

Expand the court.

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2020 Election

Trump injects more election chaos by claiming you can change your vote to him after you’ve already voted

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President Donald Trump on Tuesday issued a bizarre tweet in which he encouraged early voters to go back to polling places and demand that they be allowed to change their votes to him.

"Strongly Trending (Google) since immediately after the second debate is CAN I CHANGE MY VOTE?" the president wrote on Twitter. "This refers changing it to me. The answer in most states is YES. Go do it. Most important Election of your life!"

In reality, if you have voted early, there is no way to go back and change your vote.

Current polling averages suggest Trump is currently losing to Democratic rival Joe Biden by between eight and nine points, according to Real Clear Politics and FiveThirtyEight.

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2020 Election

Trump and Biden wage unexpected duel in Georgia

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Neighbors and volunteers are handing out water and snacks to the masked voters waiting patiently in line to cast their ballots on a hot October day in the Atlanta suburb of Smyrna.

Americans go to the polls on November 3 but the enthusiastic early voting here has already given the morning an air of Election Day.

Georgia has been a reliably Republican, conservative bastion and a Democrat has not won in the Peach State since Bill Clinton, a fellow Southerner, in 1992.

But Democratic candidate Joe Biden, 77, and Republican incumbent Donald Trump, 74, are running neck-and-neck in the polls in Georgia.

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