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New filings reveal Trump’s campaign and the GOP are in dire financial trouble

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President Donald Trump arrives for a working dinner at The Parc du Cinquantenaire in Brussels, Belgium on Jul. 11, 2018. (Alexandros Michailidis / Shutterstock.com)

On Tuesday, The New York Times reported that new filings show President Donald Trump’s campaign — and the Republican Party itself — are teetering on the brink of financial oblivion.

“New filings with the Federal Election Commission showed the extent of Mr. Trump’s cash troubles, which are severe enough that he diverted time from key battleground states and flew to California on Sunday for a fund-raiser with just over two weeks until Election Day,” reported Shane Goldmacher and Rachel Shorey. “The president ended September with just over half as much money as he had at the beginning of the month.”

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“While Mr. Trump’s campaign and its shared committees with the Republican National Committee have raised $1.5 billion since the start of 2019, the disclosures late Tuesday showed that his main re-election committee — the account that must pay for many of the race’s most important costs, including most television ads — had only a small slice remaining,” continued the report. “All told, Mr. Trump’s campaign and its shared committees with the R.N.C. had $251.4 million entering October, compared with the $432 million that Mr. Biden’s campaign and its joint accounts with the Democratic National Committee had in the bank. Some joint account funds are most likely eligible to be transferred to the main campaign committee.”

At the beginning of the year, Trump and the GOP had nearly $200 million more cash on hand than Joe Biden and the Democrats.

The cash crunch is leading the Trump campaign to scale back advertising, including in critical battleground states where some polls show them tied or trailing, like Ohio and Iowa, as well as states he had hoped to flip after they narrowly voted for Clinton in 2016, like Minnesota and New Hampshire.

“Mr. Trump’s campaign has been seeking to trim costs for more than two months, since Bill Stepien replaced Brad Parscale as campaign manager,” said the report. “Under Mr. Parscale, the campaign spent heavily as it invested in constructing a huge database of email addresses and phone numbers to reach supporters and ask for money. But as the election neared, hopeful projections for a large uptick in contributions have not materialized.”


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2020 Election

Obama says some Black men are persuaded by Trump’s ‘macho’ bravado bragging about women and money

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In part two of the SnapChat interview with President Barack Obama, Peter Hamby asked how President Donald Trump was able to persuade so many Black men to support him over President-elect Joe Biden.

When Obama was elected he got about 95 percent of the Black vote, where Biden got about 80 percent.

"Well, look, I think men, generally, are more susceptible to public figures who act tough, sort of the stereotypical macho style," Obama said, while videos of Trump showing off his flabby muscles appeared. "I don't think Black men are immune to that any more than White or Hispanic men are. A lot of the values of pop culture are extolling wealth, power, frankly, greed, not thinking about other people because you're so ruthless you're just looking out for yourself."

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2020 Election

‘I’m utterly embarrassed’: Michigan Republican admits Rudy Giuliani ‘waded into the realm of insanity’

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Michigan state Rep. Aaron Miller, a Republican, this week accused Rudy Giuliani of entering the "realm of insanity" with his testimony to lawmakers in Michigan.

Miller made the remarks following Giuliani's wild testimony to the Michigan House Oversight Committee.

"I’m happy to thoughtfully listen to evidence and claims and that was what today was supposed to be about, but Mr. Giuliani’s final statement waded into the realm of insanity," Miller said, according to The Detroit News. "He made wild and broad partisan insults for several minutes that had nothing to do with the election, and it was frankly unacceptable, shameful, and pathetic and distracts from any evidence that we might hear."

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2020 Election

Trump refuses to say whether he still has confidence in AG Bill Barr

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President Donald Trump on Thursday refused to say whether he still had confidence in embattled Attorney General Bill Barr.

According to Reuters White House correspondent Jeff Mason, the president was asked whether Barr still had his confidence, and Trump replied that reporters should ask him that question again in a few weeks.

Trump is reportedly furious at Barr for two reasons.

First, Barr told the Associated Press this week that so far the Department of Justice has found no evidence of systemic voter fraud that would change the outcome of the 2020 election.

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