Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump campaign sending out Ivanka in last-ditch effort to win over suburban women: report

Published

on

Ivanka Trump surrounded by world leaders (MSNBC)

On Saturday, The New York Times reported that President Donald Trump’s campaign is now relying on first daughter Ivanka Trump to win over some of the suburban women who have broadly rejected the president.

“A remarkable 56 percent of white women said they held a very unfavorable view of the president in a New York Times/Siena College poll. These include many independents and former Republicans who self-identify as moderate or conservative and are likely to be put off by the president’s more boorish inclinations,” reported Mark Leibovich. “As much as it’s possible, the Trump campaign is attempting to deploy the first daughter as a demographic paratrooper targeting at-risk women of the changing suburbs.”

ADVERTISEMENT

At a recent event in suburban Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for example, Ivanka was deployed to make small talk about ice cream. “I learned that the first ice cream sundae was created in this amazing state!” she told voters at the event. “Wisconsinites eat 21 million gallons of ice cream a year.”

Some presidential historians are skeptical this strategy will help the Trump campaign, however. “On the one hand, a president’s family member can offer a softening and humanizing touch … Ivanka can still be proof that is ‘See, he’s not that bad,’” Mr. Troy said. “She is trying to be some port in the storm,” said historian Gil Troy. However, he added, Ivanka’s style “becomes almost a countercampaign rather than a supporting one.”

Moreover, said the report, Ivanka “has been connected to policies and actions that critics find just as distasteful or ill-advised,” and “She has shown a knack for oblivious, tone-deaf gestures: drawing backlash, for instance, after she tweeted a photo of herself cuddling her two-year-old son amid reports of migrant children being forcibly taken from their mothers by border agents. Ms. Trump’s official position at the White House — along with that of her husband, Jared Kushner — has brought a host of criticism over nepotism and potential Hatch Act violations.”

The president is visibly self-conscious about his failure to hold onto suburban voters; at one recent rally, he asked suburban women, “Will you please like me?”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Republican’s own standing in Congress now in doubt — did his voter fraud lawsuit backfire?

Published

on

A Republican congressman from Pennsylvania has cast doubt on his own legitimacy to serve in Congress with his failed lawsuit attempting to overturn the 2020 election results.

Rep. Mike Kelly (R-PA) attempted to have the courts block certification of the 2020 election results, but his effort was rejected by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Saturday.

"The PA Supreme Court dismisses the case brought by U.S. Rep. Mike Kelly that sought to overturn last year’s law creating no-excuse mail voting and to throw out those mail ballots cast in this election," Philadelphia Inquirer correspondent Jonathan Lai reported Saturday. "This is the case the Commonwealth Court had earlier blocked certification in."

Continue Reading

2020 Election

‘Another win for democracy’: Pennsylvania AG celebrates Trump’s latest loss in court

Published

on

Republican efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election continued to be rejected by judges on Saturday.

"The PA Supreme Court dismisses the case brought by U.S. Rep. Mike Kelly that sought to overturn last year’s law creating no-excuse mail voting and to throw out those mail ballots cast in this election," Philadelphia Inquirer correspondent Jonathan Lai reported Saturday. "This is the case the Commonwealth Court had earlier blocked certification in."

Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro celebrated the ruling on Twitter.

"BREAKING: We just notched another win for democracy," Shapiro tweeted, with a red siren emoji.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

What can the left expect from a Biden-Harris administration? Pretty much nothing

Published

on

On Nov. 7 of this year, the United States let out a collective roar that rippled across the nation, resonating the crowds of blue-clad people swelling the streets and the squares, and causing buildings to tremble as those inside broke out the champagne and began to dance. The celebrations lasted long into the night. For those few precious moments, it felt as though a curse had been lifted, a nightmare abated. Trumpism had ground itself to a resounding and decisive halt and it seemed that political space on the left, and on the center ground, had finally begun to open again.

This article originally appeared at Salon.

Continue Reading