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The United States is ‘on the verge of a humanitarian catastrophe’: Texas physician

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Donald Trump removes his coronavirus mask before giving a White House campaign address. AFP.

Dr. Peter Hotez, who serves as the dean of tropical medicine at Baylor University’s School of Medicine warned on CNN that the United States is so overwhelmed with COVID-19 that it is approaching a humanitarian crisis.

Sunday marked the 12th day in a row in which the United States had over 100,000 new infections of the coronavirus in the country. The past week shows the increasing spike getting worse. Things have gotten so bad that Doctors without Borders, which normally helps with medical access in the third world, has dispatched physicians to the U.S.

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“It’s more than just heading in the wrong direction,” said Dr. Hotez. “We are on the verge of a humanitarian catastrophe approaching potentially 400,000 Americans who could perish by the early part of next year. Let’s look at where we’ll be in January when the formal transition takes place: 2,000 to 2,500 Americans will be dying every day, those are the projections.”

He explained that those numbers mean the coronavirus could become the “single leading caused of death in the United States on a daily basis.”

If there was ever a time that the United States needed steady leadership and a smooth transition, Dr. Hotez said it’s now.

“The fact that this is the time it won’t occur will only mean greater loss of life, so this is incredibly heartbreaking,” he said.

The good news is that things are going to get better. By the end of next year, most Americans will be vaccinated against the virus and can finally return to life as usual. The tragedy is in trying to keep people from spreading it until then. As has become clear, Americans are willing to risk their lives and the lives of everyone around them to do whatever they want.

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Colorado governor and husband test positive for COVID — and all Broncos QBs are benched amid outbreak

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The COVID-19 pandemic hit Colorado hard on Saturday.

"Colorado Gov. Jared Polis and his husband, Marlon Reis, have tested positive for COVID-19," The Colorado Sun reported Saturday. "The governor’s office says both are asymptomatic and isolating in their home."

The governor and first gentleman aren't the only people testing positive.

This evening I learned that First Gentleman Marlon Reis and I have tested positive for COVID-19. We are both asymptomatic, feeling well, and will continue to isolate at home. pic.twitter.com/Ttzxi72ThC

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‘Trump endangered America’s democracy’: President’s delusion broken down in brutal WaPo analysis

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President Donald Trump's refusal to accept the fact that he lost the 2020 presidential election was the focus of a Washington Post deep-dive published online Saturday night.

The story, by Philip Rucker, Ashley Parker, Josh Dawsey and Amy Gardner, was titled, "20 days of fantasy and failure: Inside Trump’s quest to overturn the election."

"The facts were indisputable: President Trump had lost. But Trump refused to see it that way," the newspaper reported. "Sequestered in the White House and brooding out of public view after his election defeat, rageful and at times delirious in a torrent of private conversations, Trump was, in the telling of one close adviser, like 'Mad King George, muttering, ‘I won. I won. I won.'’"

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Female kicker makes college American football breakthrough

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Vanderbilt University kicker Sarah Fuller made collegiate American football history Saturday as the first woman to play in a "Power Five" contest in the Commodores' 41-0 loss to Missouri.

Fuller, goalkeeper for the school's Southeastern Conference champion women's soccer squad, was given the chance to play on the gridiron after Covid-19 testing left Vanderbilt without a kicker.

"I was really excited to step out on the field and do my thing," Fuller said.

Because Vanderbilt's offensive unit sputtered, her contribution was limited to a single play -- the second-half kickoff. She punched the ball to the Missouri 35-yard line, a tricky low offering compared to the usual deeper kicks, where the Tigers fell upon it.

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