Rep. Matt Gaetz
Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) (Photo: Gage Skidmore)​

An attorney who prosecuted the case against Trump University is weighing in on news that the Dept. of Justice just successfully delayed the sentencing date of Matt Gaetz's "wingman," Joel Greenberg by four months, saying it points to something "HUGE."

"Update on Matt Gaetz — his buddy Joel Greenberg has had so much dirt that prosecutors have opened up entire new wings of their case," says former New York State prosecutor Tristan Snell, "The investigation into financial crimes now includes help from Secret Service agents. There's something HUGE here."

On Monday federal prosecutors convinced the judge that Greenberg's sentencing date should move from November 18 to some time in March.

"Did Greenberg have information on Matt Gaetz trying to buy himself a pardon from Donald Trump? Is that why the Secret Service is now involved in the investigation?" Snell tweeted.

Calling it a "bombshell," in April The Daily Beast reported it had "obtained a confession letter that Joel Greenberg wrote after asking Roger Stone to help him obtain a pardon."

That letter, The Beast revealed, was written by Greenberg "in the final months of the Trump presidency" and "claims that he and close associate Rep. Matt Gaetz paid for sex with multiple women—as well as a girl who was 17 at the time."

“On more than one occasion, this individual was involved in sexual activities with several of the other girls, the congressman from Florida's 1st Congressional District and myself," Greenberg wrote in reference to the 17-year-old.

Snell does not refer specifically to that letter, but adds: "Greenberg appears to have given the feds information about crimes totally beyond the scope of the original indictment of Greenberg — so the entire matter has snowballed."

"And if they haven't indicted Gaetz yet, it may be because the new material also implicates Gaetz."

CNN reported that on Monday "Roger Handberg, an assistant US attorney, said that Greenberg has made allegations to investigators that 'take us to some places we did not anticipate.'"

Handberg called the need for a second delay "unusual" but added the department was in an "unusual situation given the number of different investigations and lines of investigation we are pursuing."