Kellyanne Conway accuses husband George of cheating on her with Twitter
George Conway stands in the background as his wife Kellyanne Conway speaks to reporters at an event for President Donald Trump's 2017 inauguration. (AFP/File / Drew Angerer)

Kellyanne Conway's forthcoming memoir accuses her husband, George, of having an affair with a social media site, People Magazine reported on Thursday.

While some couples might feel their partner spends too much time on the internet, Conway went to the extreme.

"Heading into the school year in the fall of 2018, all four Conway children were thriving," the senior Trump adviser wrote in the book. "They were with me full-time in D.C. My mom had moved in with us to help with my Core Four. George was spending chunks of time in New York at the firm, where he voluntarily went from partner to an of-counsel role, spending his nights alone at our house in Alpine, New Jersey, 240 miles away from D.C. The numbers don't lie. During this time, the frequency and ferocity of his tweets accelerated. Clearly, he was cheating by tweeting. I was having a hard time competing with his new fling."

Instead of blaming Conway for being 240 miles away from her and the family, she says that his public disagreements with the president is what appears to have damaged their marriage.

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"Don't assume that the things he says and does are part of a rational plan or strategy, because they seldom are," Mr. Conway wrote of Trump in 2019. "Consider them as a product of his pathologies, and they make perfect sense."

Mrs. Conway refused to address it when asked by the media, but the president was eager to do so on her behalf.

"George Conway, often referred to as Mr. Kellyanne Conway by those who know him, is VERY jealous of his wife's success & angry that I, with her help, didn't give him the job he so desperately wanted," Trump responded, threatening Mr. Conway's manliness by calling him Mr. Kellyanne Conway. "I barely know him."

"I had already said publicly what I'd said privately to George," wrote Mrs. Conway in the book. "That his daily deluge of insults-by-tweet against my boss—or, as he put it sometimes, 'the people in the White House'—violated our marriage vows to 'love, honor, and cherish' each other. Those vows, of course, do not mean we must agree about politics or policies or even the president. In our democracy, as in our marriage, George was free to disagree, even if it meant a complete 180 from his active support for Trump-Pence–My Wife–2016 and a whiplash change in character from privately brilliant to publicly bombastic."

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She implies that something significant happened in 2018 to change her husband's attitude so much toward the president that it was enough he switch sides.

"Whoop-de-do, George!" Mrs. Conway told him. "You are one of millions of people who don't like the president. Congrats."

"If I had a nickel for everybody in Washington who disagreed with their spouse about something that happens in this town, I wouldn't be on this podcast. I'd be probably on a beach somewhere," Mr. Conway said about his regular disagreements with the president in an extended Skullduggery podcast in 2018. "I don't think she likes it. But I've told her, I don't like the administration. So it's even."

Critics of Mr. Conway harken back to his desperation for a job with the Trump administration. But he has said that top Justice Department gig wasn't something he wanted after Trump fired FBI Director James Comey and special counsel Robert Mueller was appointed.

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"If I get this door prize, I'm going to be in the middle of a department he's at war with," Conway recalled thinking at the time. "Why would anybody want to do this?"

He went on to brag about his wife and that she was the one who got Trump elected. Prior to her, "he was in the crapper."

By the end of 2018, Conway said he was so disgusted with the Republican Party that he was quitting.

"I don't feel comfortable being a Republican anymore," he said. "I think the Republican Party has become something of a personality cult."

All of it circulated around Trump's treatment of the Justice Department and the justice system. Mr. Conway said he was "appalled" when Trump tried to go after federal prosecutors for indicting GOP members of Congress before an election.

"To criticize the attorney general for permitting justice to be done without regard to political party is very disturbing," he said.

Thus began the internal marriage war of the Conways.

Read the full report in People Magazine.