Mitch McConnell refuses to commit to confirming a Biden Supreme Court nominee if GOP takes back the Senate
Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky speaking at the 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland. (Photo by Gage Skidmore.)

Senate Republican Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is refusing to say he will not "mount a blockade" against a possible Supreme Court nominee put forth by President Joe Biden, should the opportunity arise, if Republicans take back the Senate after the 2022 elections.

McConnell, as Majority Leader, infamously refused to even allow then-President Barack Obama's Supreme Court nominee to have any confirmation hearings, keeping the seat open if a Republican won the White House in 2016, which Donald Trump did.

In an interview with Politico's Burgess Everett, the Kentucky Republican who has been in the U.S. Senate since 1984 was asked if he would again "mount a blockade."

“Cross those bridges when I get there, we are focusing on '22," McConnell said, Everett reports. “I don't rule anything in or out about how to handle nominations if I'm in the majority position."

Politico's Anthony Adragna opines that "progressives will freak"over McConnell's remarks.

"Liberal groups have ratcheted up the pressure on Justice Stephen Breyer to consider retirement, fearing McConnell would simply keep the seat open if he regains power in the midterms.... These comments will only add fuel to those fears."

The U.S. Supreme Court currently has a 6-3 conservative majority, with three of those six justices being placed on the Court by Donald Trump. Many Democrats believe it's time to expand the court to 11 or 13 justices to better represent the American people. The Court has had nine justices since 1869. The 1870 census reported the population of the United States at just 38 million people. Today, the total U.S. population is 332 million, nearly nine times that number.