QAnon is a continuation of the long history of 'Satanic panics' in the US: report
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Trying to understand the core belief system of the QAnon conspiracy theory has been a tough endeavor for journalists, since the theory itself is constantly evolving and shifting its goal posts. But a theme that has been consistent throughout the evolution of QAnon are its references to Satanism, and according to The Bulwark's Daniel Gullotta, accusations of secret Satanic cabals lurking amongst us have a long history in this country.

Gullotta says that even though Donald Trump retweeted QAnon slogans during his time as president, it's likely that he wasn't fully aware of what they meant. "Someone with superficial knowledge of QAnon, mostly encountering its anti-child-abuse social media hashtag (#SaveOurChildren), might come away thinking that its activism against pedophilia was reasonable and commendable," Gullotta writes. "It is not surprising, then, that some curious Christians, concerned about child welfare, might initially find themselves drawn to it for that reason."

While QAnon -- although growing in popularity -- still sits on the political fringes, it's core message about Satan worshippers hidden in society has been a conspiratorial theme in Christian theology "dating back to the medieval church and the witch hunts of the early modern era."

"The fear that children are being morally corrupted, sexually abused, and physically harmed is one of the most recognizable Satanic conspiracy tropes," writes Gullotta, adding that these so-called "Satanic panics" pop up in the context of apocalyptic environments, and events from the past several years play into that trope perfectly.

"...so no one should be surprised that fears of Satanic activity have once again sprouted up. To put it another way, it might not take much nowadays to convince a person that we are living in the end times."

Read the full article over at The Bulwark.