One county in Texas turns down 7 times as many vote-by-mail applications after new suppression laws: report
Two women voting at the polls (Shutterstock)

The 2022 primary elections in Texas will come on March 1, but the voter suppression bills are already having an impact on those who hoped to participate.

The Harris County Judge, who manages elections in the largest county in the state, tweeted that she has been forced to refuse seven times as many vote by mail applications as last year.

Linda Hidalgo explained that because of the new laws, people must register to vote with their driver's license number and if you use your social security number with your mail-in ballot, it gets rejected.

Another person noted that the new ballot application was also "written to cause confusion and uncertainty." He said that it requires people to know their VUID or precinct number. The VUID is a Voter Unique Identifier. He explained it can be found by going to the Secretary of State's website input an ID or license number with date of birth. It would then spit out the VUID. The same can be said with the precinct number.

Vote.com also has a precinct location number for folks.

Many responded that one of the biggest problems is that not everyone is tech-savvy and not everyone has access to computers. For that, the Texas Secretary of State is accepting phone calls at (512) 463-5650 or email at elections@sos.texas.gov.