WATCH: Legal experts explain the significance of 'astounding' Trump call-log revelation
Donald Trump speaks to a large crowd at "An Address to Young America" an event hosted by Students for Trump and Turning Point Action. (Nuno21 / Shutterstock.com)

Legal analysts are coming forward with their own commentary about the recent revelation that there was more than a seven-hour gap in the phone logs for former President Donald Trump on Jan. 6, 2021.

Speaking to CNN, former federal prosecutor Elie Honig explained that prosecutors use the phrase "consciousness of guilt," which means when people take steps preemptively to hide their communication, they're doing it for a reason.

"That's what jumps out to me here," he explained. "If you look at the pattern, using the normal White House phone subject to the logs all morning, all up until 11:17 a.m. Then he stopped. And it looks like he made a decision I'm going to take this offline for the next 7 1/2 hours. To me, that's really compelling evidence of his state of mind."

CNN host Jim Sciutto asked if such a gap indicates evidence exists that laws were broken.

READ: ‘Woodward and I have the docs’: Robert Costa posts Jan. 6 WH call logs that could be big trouble for Trump and allies

"It may reveal more than that, Jim," said former federal prosecutor Renato Mariotti. "If, for example, there were other phones being used surreptitiously that were not only not being recorded and not being provided, but actually were being used for the purpose of hiding activity or communications. We do know that some of the other folks around the former president were using what is called burner phones, using phones that you -- that you would toss away. So, it is certainly raises a lot of questions and I think what is going to be an important step for the [House] committee is to make sure that they are able to talk to folks that were close to former President Trump and see if there are witnesses that recall seeing him on the phone during that period of time."

Sciutto wondered if the use of a burner phone would signify intent or indicate an attempt to hide something. Mariotti agreed, noting that it is a practice known to be used for criminal activity.

"I used to get wiretaps on phones when I was a federal prosecutor and the folks that use burner phones were usually drug dealers, people who were involved in the drug cartel in some way," he recalled. "People who knew they had to toss their phone every 30 days to try to stymie the efforts of people like myself and law enforcement. So, I think it would certainly be astounding if something like that happened, and I think the explanation for the Trump camp has to be he was off the phone for seven hours straight. And really what investigators are going to need to establish is, first of all, was he the sort of person who could stay off the phone for seven hours and on that day can they establish through other evidence he was on the phone. And if so, where are the records? it reminds me of the Nixon gap, but a much larger one."

See the comments below:


Elie Honig www.youtube.com

Renato Mariotti www.youtube.com