Quantcast
Connect with us

White House threatens to veto cyber security bill CISPA

Published

on

The White House’s Office of Management and Budget on Wednesday announced that President Barack Obama would veto the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), unless important changes were made to the controversial cyber security bill.

“The Administration is committed to increasing public-private sharing of information about cybersecurity threats as an essential part of comprehensive legislation to protect the Nation’s vital information systems and critical infrastructure,” the White House said in an email. “The sharing of information must be conducted in a manner that preserves Americans’ privacy, data confidentiality, and civil liberties and recognizes the civilian nature of cyberspace.”

ADVERTISEMENT

The bill proposes an “cybersecurity threat information” sharing scheme in which Internet companies, such as Internet service providers and social networking sites, would pass private communications to the Department of Homeland Security, the IRS and the National Security Agency without an judicial oversight.

CISPA currently enjoys a broad base of support among Internet companies, including Google and Facebook. The bill is expected to come up for a vote in the House of Representatives later this week despite strong opposition from groups like the American Civil Liberties Union, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Center for Democracy and Technology, the Constitution Project, Fight for the Future and others.

“The American people expect their Government to enhance security without undermining their privacy and civil liberties,” the White House said. “Without clear legal protections and independent oversight, information sharing legislation will undermine the public’s trust in the Government as well as in the Internet by undermining fundamental privacy, confidentiality, civil liberties, and consumer protections.”

Rep. Mike Rogers (R-MI) and Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD), the bill’s sponsors, brushed aside the veto threat. They said that the White House’s privacy and civil liberties concerns had already been dealt with.

“The bipartisan managers of the bill… have agreed to a package of amendments that address nearly every single one of the criticisms leveled by the Administration, particularly those regarding privacy and civil liberties of Americans,” they said in a statement.

ADVERTISEMENT

With prior reporting by Stephen C. Webster


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Central Park incident just one more example of white women using their status to terrorize black men: NYT’s Charles Blow

Published

on

Amy Cooper is just the latest example of white women using their privilege and femininity to terrorize black men, according to a new column from Charles Blow.

The New York Times columnist explains that a video recording of an incident involving Cooper, an investment manager, and Christian Cooper, a science editor, has a long and shameful historical precedent.

"This racial street theater against black people is an endemic, primal feature of the Republic," Blow write. "Specifically, I am enraged by white women weaponizing racial anxiety, using their white femininity to activate systems of white terror against black men. This has long been a power white women realized they had and that they exerted."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

New Zealand epidemiologist: ‘We look at Trump’s behavior and we’re horrified’

Published

on

To learn how New Zealand has largely eliminated COVID-19, we continue our extended interview with Michael Baker, an epidemiologist who is a member of the New Zealand Ministry of Health’s Technical Advisory Group and advising the government on its response to the COVID-19 pandemic. He describes how the country’s response compares to the government actions in the United States and worldwide.

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The Quarantine Report. I’m Amy Goodman, with Juan González, as we bring you Part 2 of our discussion of New Zealand.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump White House hammered for covering up their own economic projections as jobs vanish

Published

on

The Trump White House has decided against releasing midyear economic projections this summer, breaking precedent at a time when unemployment is expected to top 20 percent.

The Washington Post reports that the administration is not releasing updated economic projections that "would almost certainly codify an administration assessment that the coronavirus pandemic has led to a severe economic downturn" with massive job losses that have topped 36 million in just two months.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image