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‘Let the war begin’: Anonymous knocks hate sites offline as KKK ‘hoods off’ campaign continues

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Hackers operating under the banner of Anonymous released another cache of information on people the group says are affiliated with the Ku Klux Klan and other white supremacist organizations.

Twitter accounts associated with the collective posted links on Tuesday morning to a document posted to PrivatePaste.com, a confidential pastebin. A pastebin is an Internet platform where users can store and display text, code configurations or other information.

In the PrivatePaste document are addresses, phone numbers, occupations and other information about Klan and white supremacist websites and the people who run and maintain them, as well as personal information about Klan members from Texas, California, Arkansas and other locations.

Anonymous poster @SouthFlCopBlock put up a link to a letter from the collective explaining to the white supremacists why Anonymous has aggressively targeted them as part of a campaign known as #OpKKK and #HoodsOff.

“Having fun riding the waves of losing twitter accounts, ddos attacks, and being caught with your zipper down?” asked the letter, which contained the names and contact information of more than a hundred alleged white supremacists.

The Anonymous campaign began when Klan chapters announced that they would be targeting protesters with “lethal force” in and around Ferguson, Missouri should riots follow a grand jury’s decision about Officer Darren Wilson. Wilson shot and killed unarmed teen Michael Brown in Ferguson last August.

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Anonymous responded by “doxxing” dozens of Klan members, i.e., posting their personal information and photos on line, hence the hashtag “#HoodsOff.” Then the hacker organization seized control of the Klan’s various Twitter accounts, posting images of a lynched Klansman and taunting the original owners of the accounts.

On Tuesday, the campaign continued, with Anonymous moving beyond the Klan to target racist websites like Stormfront.org and writing, “The aim of our operation is nothing more than Cyber Warfare. Anything you upload will be taken down, anything you use to promote the KKK will be shut down. DDoS attacks have already been sent and have infiltrated your servers over the past 2 days — d0x’s have also been launched on leaders of the KKK. All information retrieved will be given to the public.”

DDoS (distributed denial-of-service) attacks are an illegal tool used by hackers to shut down a website by flooding it with so many dummy requests that the server overloads and goes offline. Anonymous is claiming to have knocked multiple Klan websites offline in several states including North Carolina, Utah and Texas, as well as a website for white supremacist group the Traditional American Knights.

“Let the war begin,” said the Anonymous letter. “We do not forgive. We do not forget. Ku Klux Klan you should have expected us.”

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