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Josh Duggar quits anti-LGBT religious group as demand grows for family’s TLC show cancellation

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Reality star and conservative activist Josh Duggar has resigned from his position at the Family Research Council amid allegations that he molested underage girls as a teenager, People magazine reported.

“Twelve years ago, as a young teenager, I acted inexcusably for which I am extremely sorry and deeply regret. I hurt others, including my family and close friends,” Duggar said in a statement. “I confessed this to my parents who took several steps to help me address the situation. We spoke with the authorities where I confessed my wrongdoing, and my parents arranged for me and those affected by my actions to receive counseling. I understood that if I continued down this wrong road that I would end up ruining my life.”

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The uproar against Duggar and his show developed after police documents obtained by In Touch Weekly revealed that Duggar had been investigated multiple times for allegedly fondling underage girls, including his own sisters.

According toHollywood Life, that prompted calls for his show, 19 Kids and Counting, to be cancelled.

TLC has canceled all airing of “19 Kids and Counting” as the network ponders the show’s long0term future.

While the outcry is not a formal campaign, a search of Duggar’s name on Twitter shows several users lobbying The Learning Channel, which broadcasts the program, including progressive blogger JoeMyGod:

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Duggar’s father reportedly told police that Duggar admitted to molesting the girls in 2002, but the TLC star was not charged at the time, and the three-year statute of limitations involved in such cases expired.

Late last year, Duggar’s mother Michelle lobbied against a local ordinance in Fayetteville, Arkansas that barred discrimination against residents based on their gender or sexuality.

Michelle Duggar recorded “robocalls” that went out to residents urging them to overturn Ordinance 119, saying, “I doubt that Fayetteville parents would stand for a law that would endanger their daughters or allow them to be traumatized by a man joining them in their private space.” The statute was overturned, after 52 percent of voters chose to have it struck down.

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The Southern Poverty Law Center has classified Duggar’s former employer as an anti-LGBT hate group, saying “its real specialty is defaming gays and lesbians.”


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Historians demolish John Yoo for claim Founding Fathers wouldn’t want Trump impeached in an election year

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Comments made by attorney and law professor John Yoo on Fox News on the Founding Father's intentions about impeachment received a brutal debunking by two historians -- including one of his colleagues at UC Berkeley.

Appearing with Fox News personality Laura Ingraham, lawyer Yoo -- who is infamous for providing President George W. Bush's administration with legal justifications for the torture of prisoners of war -- claimed that the Founding Fathers would object to the president being impeached in an election year.

According to Yoo, Democrats are getting it all wrong when they say the Constitution compels them to hold impeachment proceedings against Trump just one year before the election.

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McConnell drops a surprise on Trump — calls for an even stronger resolution to rebuke him

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) indicated he opposes the bill out of the House to denounce President Donald Trump's military withdrawal in Syria because it isn't tough enough, reported Bloomberg's Steven Dennis.

https://twitter.com/StevenTDennis/status/1184840222846148608

"My first preference is for something stronger than the House resolution," McConnell said according to Bloomberg's Laura Litvan.

She went on to say that McConnel wants a bill that outlines what action should take place in Syria.

McConnell said the House version was "curiously silent on the issue of whether to actually to sustain a U.S. military presence in Syria."

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Mad dog Trump and his Bible-thumping kennel pals: White House theocrats may be the biggest danger of all

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“I have done nothing to harm these people but they are angered with me, so what do they do, doctor up some income tax, for which they have no case… to harass a peaceful man.”

You could be excused for thinking that Donald Trump spoke these words of self-pity. In fact, they’re from Robert de Niro, playing that other gangster, Al Capone, in the 1987 movie The Untouchables, written by David Mamet.

Like Trump, a would-be dictator madly claiming the overwhelming support of the populace, the real-life Capone insisted that his criminal acts satisfied “a public demand.” He declared, “I am just a businessman, giving the people what they want.” And a certain percentage of the civilian population—Capone’s “base,” if you will—thought he was just swell.

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