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Morning Joe hosts scorch Ben Carson: Does he think Noah built the Eiffel Tower, too?

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The Morning Joe crew found themselves wondering about Ben Carson’s worldviews after learning the 2016 candidate still believes that the biblical figure Joseph built the pyramids in Egypt to store grain.

Carson’s theory first came to light when Buzzfeed found a video of his commencement speech at Andrews University, in which he said, ““My own personal theory is that Joseph built the pyramids to store grain.” The university is associated with Seventh Day Adventists, an evangelical Christian faith the retired neurosurgeon adheres to. During the speech Carson also said some scientists believe aliens built the pyramids, which is not true.

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“It doesn’t require an alien being when God is with you,” he had said.

When asked about the comment recently, Carson doubled down.

“The pyramids were made in a way that they had hermetically-sealed compartments. You wouldn’t need hermetically-sealed compartments for a sepulcher. You would need that if you were trying to preserve grain over a long period of time,” he said.

The Morning Joe hosts seemed to be left speechless by the comments.

“I’m completely speechless, I mean what can you say about that?” journalist Eugene Robinson said.

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“Yeah but you could say, ‘I was drunk when I gave that speech and now I take it back,'” Joe Scarborough suggested.

Robinson then said Carson’s theory begs a lot of “follow-up questions about history.”

“In this case, I kind of want to know now how old Ben Carson thinks the earth is,” Scarborough said. “If you say something like that you — for a conservative, opened the door. Do you believe the earth is 5,000 years old. Do you believe its billions of years old? Because this is some really, really quirky stuff… I wanna know if he thinks Noah built the Eiffel Tower.”

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Watch the segment, via MSNBC here:


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‘Any other attorney general would resign’: MSNBC’s Morning Joe scalds Barr for ‘lying’ about FBI

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MSNBC's Joe Scarborough scalded Attorney General William Barr for lying about the inspector general report he ordered to justify President Donald Trump's conspiracy theories.

The Department of Justice's inspector general failed to find evidence of an FBI plot against Trump's 2016 campaign, but Barr publicly disagreed with those findings and insisted there was not enough justification to launch the Russia investigation.

"His lie about Barack Obama, you know, crawling around Trump Tower like bugging his phone, a lie," Scarborough said. "The lie from the attorney general of the United States, just shocking, that FBI agents, quote, 'spied,' spied on the president of the United States -- a lie."

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Maddow shocked AG Bill Barr did not resign after IG report undermined his conspiracy theories

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The host of "The Rachel Maddow Show" on MSNBC wondered why Attorney General Bill Barr did not resign after his own Justice Department debunked a conspiracy theory pushed by the nation's chief law enforcement officer.

Maddow explained how the Department of Justice Inspector General report released Thursday debunked Barr's claim that there had been "spying" on the 2016 Trump campaign.

The host played a clip of Barr testifying under oath before Congress.

"I think spying did occur," Barr testified.

"Spying did not occur according to the Justice Department," Maddow noted. "The Justice Department's independent inspector general report came out concluding definitively, the Trump campaign was not spied on.

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CNN panel pounds Rick Santorum for claiming Democrats went ‘too far’ in calling Trump an existential threat

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On Monday's edition of CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360," former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-PA) tried to argue Democrats were overreaching in the impeachment hearings — only to be smacked down by his co-panelists.

"The thing that bothered me from the hearing was this whole thing that the president is an existential threat to the republic," said Santorum. "You know, I've always said this about my friends on the left. They always go one step too far that just — that makes people sort of scratch their head and say, well, I may not like what he did, but to call this an existential threat to the republic is just a little bit too far ... I understand why they're doing it. They're trying to stoke it up. I get why they're doing it. I just don't think it's very effective. It's too much."

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