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Christian leader: Trump reveals that progressives were right about evangelicals all along

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In a column for the Washington Post, conservative Christian leader Russell Moore is denouncing evangelical leaders for cynically embracing Donald Trump to leverage his popularity, though Trump doesn’t practice Christian values.

Moore, president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, wrote on Monday that he has stopped calling himself an “evangelical” and instead refers to himself as a “gospel Christian” because he feels the word “evangelical” has been contaminated with contemporary politics.

While Moore doesn’t mention the real estate mogul and GOP front runner by name, he alludes to Trump as someone who this election cycle has been “spewing of profanities in campaign speeches, race-baiting and courting white supremacists, boasting of adulterous affairs, debauching public morality and justice through the casino and pornography industries.”

Moore has long been a critic of both Trump and the Christian right’s courting of him even though Trump doesn’t seem to know anything about the Bible. Recently Trump has been widely condemned for refusing to disavow support from white supremacists. Moore has in the past advocated for racial integration of Christian churches.

“Why are many evangelical leaders, including some who pontificate on nearly everything else, scared silent as evangelicalism is associated with everything from authoritarianism and bigotry to violations of religious freedom?” Moore asked. “How can they look the other way in silence when politicians praise Planned Parenthood and demur about white supremacists and neo-Nazis?”

Moore then admitted that “secular progressives” had been right in one criticism of contemporary evangelicals, who fuse religion and politics to gain power.

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“For years, secular progressives have said that evangelical social action in America is not about religious conviction but all about power,” Moore wrote. “They have implied that the goal of the Religious Right is to cynically use the ‘moral’ to get to the ‘majority,’ not the other way around. This year, a group of high-profile old-guard evangelicals has proven these critics right.”

He criticized a willingness to look the other way when the word “evangelical” is “co-opted by heretics and lunatics.”

Moore had been critical of Liberty University president Jerry Falwell, Jr.’s endorsement of Trump, tweeting, “Politics driving the gospel rather than the other way around is the third temptation of Christ. He overcame it. Will we?”

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‘He should be hospitalized’: Internet stunned after Trump goes off on completely incoherent Mt Rushmore rant

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President Donald Trump was asked on Tuesday whether his face should appear on Mount Rushmore along with other major American presidents.

“If I answer that question yes, I will end up with such bad publicity,” Trump told The Hill, before pivoting to an incoherent rant about fireworks.

The president's rambling shocked many people on Twitter:

Apart from Trump’s apparent inability to string together coherent English sentences on the fly, note also the sheer ignorance and apathy toward the idea that there might be legitimate reasons why fireworks are not detonated around the Black Hills. https://t.co/jja2XD19Mw

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Trump: Immigrants didn’t want to come to America before I was president because ‘Obama wasn’t a cheerleader’

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President Donald Trump's strange rant about fireworks at Mt. Rushmore wasn't the only head-scratching exchange that occurred during his recent interview with reporters from The Hill.

During another part of the interview, Trump was asked about Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's (D-NY) criticism of the internment camps he's been using to house immigrant children.

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Trump is unhappy in reality — so he’s inviting everyone into his world of make-believe: columnist

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Confabulation is an unintentional event where someone's memory creates "fabricated, distorted, or misinterpreted memories about oneself or the world." Parataxic distortion is when a person tends to "skew perceptions" of others based on fantasy. Then there's political opportunism, a "diagnosis" that plagues politicians almost exclusively. Regardless of the cause, Washington Post syndicated columnist Michael Gerson noted President Donald Trump is not only creating his own reality, he's inviting his supporters to live inside of it.

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Trump endorses killing journalists, like Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. Online ad networks are now targeting sites that cover acts of violence against dissidents, LGBTQ people and people of color.

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