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Kellyanne Conway shrugs off Trump’s call to jail Clinton as a ‘quip’

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Donald Trump drew cheers from his supporters during Sunday’s presidential debate by suggesting he would lock up Hillary Clinton in jail if he was elected president.

The Republican nominee’s rallies are frequently punctuated by supporters chanting “lock her up,” and he interrupted Clinton to say he would throw her in jail if he was placed in charge of the executive branch.

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“You know, it’s just awfully good that someone with the temperament of Donald Trump is not in charge of the law in this country,” Clinton said, and Trump shot back: “Because you’d be in jail.”

MSNBC’s Willie Geist asked Trump’s campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, on Monday morning whether her boss stood by his “offhand” comment about jailing Clinton.

“That was a quip,” Conway said. “And I saw in NBC’s own reporting, it was referred to as a ‘quip,’ so I’ll go with NBC on it.”

NBC did refer to Trump’s comment as a quip in a report that described his “unprecedented: threat to jail Clinton “a direct breach of the tradition of nonpartisan rule of law.”

Trump suggested in August that “Second Amendment” people might be able to stop Clinton from picking U.S. Supreme Court justices if she wins, and last month he urged her Secret Service detail to disarm to “see what happens to her.”

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Conway backed Trump’s promise to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate Clinton’s use of a private email server as Secretary of State, which the FBI examined and found no evidence of criminal wrongdoing.

“I think that’s Donald Trump channeling the frustration he hears from thousands of voters on the stump every day,” Conway said. “They’re very frustrated that she has a different set of rules for her.”

The FBI director has resisted calls from Republican lawmakers to reopen the investigation, saying there wasn’t enough evidence to suggest Clinton was part of a coverup operation — but Conway said Trump would pursue prosecution if he was elected.

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“How can she not have faced any type of penalty for doing something where people who do far less have faced a serious penalty?” Conway said.

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Michigan man assaults passerby who made fun of him for wearing coronavirus mask made from thong underwear

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On Wednesday, The Daily Beast reported police in Michigan are looking for a 47-year-old man accused of assaulting a passerby who had made fun of him for wearing a coronavirus mask made out of thong underwear.

"According to The Battle Creek Enquirer, the 57-year-old victim told police he was in his home on Monday evening when the suspect approached him wearing thong underwear over his face. The victim allegedly told the suspect that the makeshift mask looked like the thongs laying around his own home."

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Trump ‘said the quiet part out loud again and acknowledged when more people vote Dems win’: MSNBC host

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MSNBC's Chuck Todd had to cut into President Donald Trump's Wednesday press conference twice to fact-check inaccurate claims he was making. However, one thing Katy Tur noticed, amid the inaccuracies about vote-by-mail, that Trump inadvertently "said the quiet part out loud again."

Democrats have said that one of their most-haves in the next coronavirus bill is funding for states that want to go to a vote-by-mail system.

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Trump’s ex-ethics director: The president is in the late stage of ‘an authoritarian coup

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When Donald Trump was running for president in 2016, he vowed to “drain the swamp” if elected — which was his way of promising to clean up the political environment in Washington, D.C. and make the federal government more accountable. But former ethics official Walter Shaub, in an op-ed for USA Today, argues that Trump’s presidency has been a nonstop attack on accountability.

Shaub served as director of the U.S. Office of Government Ethics from 2013-2017. He resigned in the middle of Trump’s first year in office in protest of the White House’s complete disregard for ethics rules. And in his new op-ed, Shaub details some of the many ways in which accountability has been under attack during Trump’s presidency — from his “assault on inspectors general” to “open presidential profiteering” to the firing of officials who stood up to him, including former FBI Director James Comey and former Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

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