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Ex-Klan head David Duke goes bonkers at raucous senate debate: ‘Hillary should get the electric chair!’

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In a debate before an empty auditorium at Louisiana’s Dillard University, former Ku Klux Klan head David Duke traded insults with his opponents and got into a screaming match with the moderator as the debate broke up and his rivals scurried away.

According to WGNO,  Duke barely qualified to participate in the debate between candidates seeking one of Louisiana’s U.S. Senate seats.

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Duke certainly made his presence felt. He called for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to be put to death in the electric chair, and defended his special brand of anti-Semitism.

Asked about his attitude towards Jews, Duke replied, “I’m not opposed to all Jews. I’m against Jews or anybody else that puts the interests of some other place over our own country.”

Duke’s opponents showed nothing but contempt for the former Klansman, with one of his rivals, Louisiana treasurer John Kennedy, sharing Duke’s inmate number and calling him a “swindler,” from when he was a federal prisoner after being convicted of felony embezzlement.

Caroline Fayard, added, “David Duke is a snake that slithered out of the swamp,” with Foster Campbell contributing, “I have nothing in common with David Duke except probably that we’re both breathing.”

For his part, Duke ended the debate by wildly gesticulating and shouting at moderator John Snell who attempted to state for the record that Duke was not targeted by the government for his beliefs, but because he admittedly stole supporters’ money to pay for his gambling habit.

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“Let me rebut! Let me rebut! See you’re not a moderator. You’re a typical media hack! Are you going to silence me?” Duke yelled. “I have a right to respond! That’s the problem with this. The federal government targeted me. I have a right to respond!”

As his fellow candidates quickly shook hands and dispersed, Duke remained on the stage bellowing at them as they left the hall.

Watch video excerpts below via YouTube:

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COVID-19

White House adds 20 percent increase to ‘best case’ projection of coronavirus deaths

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The White House is moving the goal posts once again. Instead of taking drastic action, like asking every state's governor to mandate a quarantine to reduce the spread of coronavirus, it is quietly upping its projected death toll, just one day after stunning Americans with a six-digit death rate.

On Sunday President Donald Trump told Americans he thinks if 100,000 Americans die from coronavirus he will have done "a very good job."

On Monday Dr. Deborah Birx announced the White House is projecting 100,000 to 200,000 deaths.

Tuesday evening, the number increased 20 percent.

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Elections 2016

Olympic athletes in ‘impossible position’ – Canada

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Canadian Olympic chiefs said Monday the health and safety of athletes had prompted the country's decision to withdraw its team from the Tokyo Olympics amid the coronavirus pandemic.

A day after Canada became the first team to announce its withdrawal from the July 24-August 9 Games, Canadian Olympic Committee (COC) chief David Shoemaker said athletes had been left in an "impossible position."

With public health authorities urging individuals to stay inside to curb the spread of COVID-19, athletes had been caught between a desire to heed health and safety advice while trying to minimize disruption to training programs.

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Elections 2016

Vietnamese women strive to clear war-era mines

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Inching across a field littered with Vietnam war-era bombs, Ngoc leads an all-women demining team clearing unexploded ordnance that has killed tens of thousands of people -- including her uncle.

"He died in an explosion. I was haunted by memories of him," Le Thi Bich Ngoc tells AFP as she oversees the controlled detonation of a cluster bomb found in a sealed-off site in central Quang Tri province.

More than 6.1 million hectares of land in Vietnam remain blanketed by unexploded munitions -- mainly dropped by US bombers -- decades after the war ended in 1975.

At least 40,000 Vietnamese have since died in related accidents. Victims are often farmers who accidentally trigger explosions, people salvaging scrap metal, or children who mistake bomblets for toys.

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