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GOP lawmaker claims free speech right to call for lynching of anti-Confederate elected officials

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A Mississippi lawmaker argues that he was exercising his free speech rights when he called for elected to be “lynched” for removing Confederate flags and monuments from public display.

Lawyers for state Rep. Karl Oliver (R-Winona) responded to a lawsuit filed against him by attorney and activist Carlos Moore, who asked the court to order the Republican lawmaker to read books about Emmett Till and other black Americans who were lynched, reported WJTV-TV.

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Oliver’s attorneys filed a 24-point defense of the lawmaker, who they argued was not acting in his official capacity when he called for “Nazi-ish” elected officials to be hanged.

“The destruction of these monuments, erected in the loving memory of our family and fellow Southern Americans, is both heinous and horrific,” Oliver posted in May on his personal Facebook page. “If the, and I use this term extremely loosely, ‘leadership’ of Louisiana wishes to, in a Nazi-ish fashion, burn books or destroy historical monuments of OUR HISTORY, they should be LYNCHED! Let it be known, I will do all in my power to prevent this from happening in our State.”

Attorneys disputed Moore’s complaint that the threat was specific, and they argued that Oliver was protected against the lawsuit by both the First and 11th Amendments.

Oliver’s attorneys argued that Moore lacked standing to file the suit, which did not name the state as a defendant, and asked the court to dismiss the case and order the plaintiff to repay the lawmaker’s legal fees.

Moore, who has worked to remove Confederate imagery from the Mississippi state flag, asked the court to order Oliver to read the books, “The Blood of Emmett Till,” by Timothy Tyson, and “At The Hands of Persons Unknown: The Lynching of Black America,” by Phillip Dray.

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The attorney sought a court order requiring Oliver to submit written summaries of at least 3,000 words of both history books.


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Mitch McConnell’s impeachment rules pass by 53-47 vote — here’s what happens next in Trump’s senate trial

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The US Senate voted along party lines on Tuesday to set the rules for President Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial.

By a 53 to 47 vote, the Republican-controlled Senate approved an "organizing resolution" for the trial proposed by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Before approving the rules, the Senate voted down several amendments proposed by Democrats seeking to subpoena witnesses and documents from the White House and State Department.

These are the next phases in Trump's impeachment trial, just the third of a president in US history:

- Opening arguments -

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Chief Justice Roberts admonishes lawyers at Senate impeachment trial

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Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court John Roberts made his first major intervention in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial shortly before 1 a.m. Wednesday morning.

After House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) finished his closing arguments on why former National Security Advisor John Bolton should testify, the White House team went on the attack. Yelling and demanding apologies, the president's team was more animated than they'd been all night. Roberts then admonished the House and White House on their language.

Claiming the Senate is the "world's greatest deliberative body" -- despite what he had witnessed during 12 hours of the impeachment trial -- Roberts complained about language that was "not conducive to civil discourse."

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White House lawyers begin yelling at Democrats during late-night impeachment trial — after Trump starts tweeting

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President Donald Trump woke up and began tweeting around midnight EST during the Senate impeachment trial over the amendments over the rules. That's when a noticeable thing changed on the Senate floor: Trump's team started yelling.

Nearing 1 a.m. EST Tuesday morning while the president was tweeting about impeachment, his team began attacking Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY) personally. They called him a liar and accused him of attacking the president and demanded an apology. After nearly 12 hours this was the first time the White House got even remotely animated after a dull defense of the president.

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