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White House aide Omarosa being forced out by Kelly for getting Trump worked up over negative press: report

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As part of his solidification of power, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly is blocking Donald Trump confidante Omarosa Manigualt from speaking with the president because she is getting him worked up over bad news.

According to the Daily Beast, the former Apprentice contestant has been increasingly blocked from seeing the president at  former General Kelly’s command in an effort to control what information is delivered to Trump.

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The issue for Kelly has been preventing Omarosa — who serves as the communications director for the Office of Public Liaison — and other senior staffers from sharing unvetted and dubious news articles with the president in an effort to influence Trump.

According to sources in the White House, those articles get Trump all riled up and distract him from the conducting the business at hand — with Manigualt being one of the worst offenders.

“When Gen. Kelly is talking about clamping down on access to the Oval, she’s patient zero,” one source explained,

Another source added that Kelly, “is not thrilled by any means by [Manigault]. He is, however, thrilled that he has been able to stop staffers including Omarosa from bolting into the Oval Office and triggering the president with White House [palace] intrigue stories.”

According to one source, the news articles shared with Trump tended to be from “obscure, gossipy websites, and concerned White House palace intrigue, media personalities, or prominent Republicans in Congress.”

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Manigualt is reportedly not happy with the new arrangement and it remains to be seen whether Kelly’s influence may lead to her leaving the White House.

You can read the whole report here.


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2020 Election

Trump campaign ramps up smear campaign on Obama’s ebola czar for exposing the president’s COVID-19 bumbling: report

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Stung by a highly effective video he made for Vice President Joe Biden criticizing Donald Trump's response to the growing COVID-19 pandemic, the communications team working on the president's re-election is going after President Barack Obama's former ebola czar, Ron Klain.

Klain, who is now becoming a fixture on cable news, took part in a video ad touting the campaign of Biden, and used his expertise to rip into the Trump administration's efforts to deal with the national health crisis. That put a target on his back as the president's 2020 campaign team is trying to stem the damage that threatens the president's chances of being re-elected in November.

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Trump ignored advice to tell country the coronavirus pandemic was ‘bad and could get very worse’ in early March: report

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According to a day-by-day examination of the White House efforts to get up to speed on dealing with the growing coronavirus pandemic that has now brought the country to an almost complete standstill, Politico reports that Donald Trump was advised in early March to warn the public things were about to get worse and chose to ignore that advice.

The report notes that the final realization about the dangerous spread of COVID-19 preceded the president's rare prime time address to the nation.

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Why the novel coronavirus became a social media nightmare

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The biggest reputational risk Facebook and other social media companies had expected in 2020 was fake news surrounding the US presidential election. Be it foreign or domestic in origin, the misinformation threat seemed familiar, perhaps even manageable.

The novel coronavirus, however, has opened up an entirely different problem: the life-endangering consequences of supposed cures, misleading claims, snake-oil sales pitches and conspiracy theories about the outbreak.

So far, AFP has debunked almost 200 rumors and myths about the virus, but experts say stronger action from tech companies is needed to stop misinformation and the scale at which it can be spread online.

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