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Why is a fired White House staffer writing Trump’s speeches and meeting with Chinese leaders?

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Ousted Donald Trump chief strategist Steve Bannon and Wang Qishan, Secretary of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the Communist Party of China (composite image).

Donald Trump’s ousted chief strategist traveled to Beijing last week for a “secret meeting” with a top Communist Party of China leader, according to a bombshell Financial Times report.

The meeting allegedly took place at Zhongnanhai, the legendary Communist Party central headquarters adjacent to the Forbidden City.

The clandestine meeting was with Wang Qishan, “the second most powerful Chinese Communist Party official,” according to the Financial Times. Qishan is a member of the Politburo’s Standing Committee and is the Secretary of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the Communist Party of China.

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“Mr Wang, who is seen as the second most powerful person in China after President Xi Jinping, arranged through an intermediary for a 90-minute meeting,” the Financial Times reported. “After Mr Trump won the election, China frequently approached Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and top aide, to help navigate the US-China relationship. But Mr Kushner has taken much less of a role in recent months.”

The news was so big that it is being viewed as an indicator of internal power in the People’s Republic of China.

“The secret meeting between Mr Bannon and Mr Wang will also stoke speculation that the Chinese anti-graft tsar, who has purged hundreds of senior government officials and military officers for corruption in recent years, may continue to work closely with Mr Xi during his second term in office,” the Financial Times noted. “Before his appointment as head of the party’s Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, Mr Wang was Beijing’s point man for Sino-US relations and has played a pivotal role in most of China’s key financial reforms over the past 20 years.”

Bannon was ousted in August but is said to be still advising President Trump over the phone.

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2020 Election

Donald Trump dodges questions at turkey pardon: ‘Will you be interested in a pardon for yourself?’

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President Donald Trump on Tuesday declined to say whether he will be seeking a pardon as he prepares to leave the White House.

At an annual White House Thanksgiving ceremony, Trump took credit for new stock market gains and suggested that President-elect Joe Biden should adopt his "America First" slogan.

After pardoning a turkey named Corn, Trump, who was accompanied by First Lady Melania Trump, ignored questions shouted by reporters.

"Any pardons before leaving office?" ABC correspondent Jonathan Karl could be heard yelling. "Will you be interested in a pardon for yourself."

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2020 Election

Fox News’ Laura Ingraham finally tells her audience Trump’s bid to stay in office has little hope

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After President Donald Trump announced his General Services Administrator (GSA) Emily Murphy would be moving forward with the Biden transition, Fox News host Laura Ingraham broke the news to her audience in a seemingly awkward on-air announcement.

On Monday evening, after Trump tweeted to thank Murphy for her work, Ingraham recalled all that has transpired during the post-election period as she discussed the reality of what lies ahead. Although Trump has repeatedly declared he has won the election while continuing to give his supporters a false sense of hope, Ingraham made it clear that Trump overturning the election would be unlikely.

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Biden’s plan to reverse Trump’s legacy of encouraging white nationalism is fraught with challenges: columnist

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According to the Washington Post's Greg Sargent, President Trump has set a "hidden trap" for Joe Biden once he assumes the mantle of the presidency.

"Biden vowed to 'restore the soul of the nation' as president, meaning he won’t use the power and influence of the office to carry out a white nationalist agenda or to lend support to right-wing extremists and white supremacists, instead 'uniting' the country," Sargent writes.

A huge problem Biden faces, according to Sargent, is how to reverse the legacy of the Trump administration when it comes to encouraging white nationalism and violent domestic extremism.

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