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John Dean warns Trump White House they’ll be ‘playing with fire’ if they follow Bannon advice to attack Mueller

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John Dean, Former White House Counsel for United States President Richard Nixon (Photo: Screen capture)

Responding to a report from CNN’s Dana Bash that former Donald Trump senior strategist Steve Bannon is encouraging the White House to go on the offensive against special counsel Robert Mueller, former Nixon-era White House lawyer John Dean warned that would be making a big mistake.

According to Bash, “I’m being told as some of our other colleagues have been told that the president is really angry and that people inside the White House are certainly kind of feeling the reverberations of what happened today.”

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“And as part of that, because of that, the president is hearing advice from his former top adviser, Steve Bannon, who is saying that he wants people inside the White House to basically engage in a crash-and-burn strategy,” she continued. “This is from a source close to Steve Bannon. That he wants the White House to get Republicans on Capitol Hill to cut funding for the special counsel, publicly debate Bob Mueller’s mandate, slow document production, go to court and try to slow documents being requested there and go on a massive PR campaign and try to get Capitol Hill to engage.”

Host Don Lemon then turned to the panel, with prosecutor Renato Mariotti expressing dismay.

“I’m just as an American citizen and as somebody who spent years in law enforcement. I ‘m concerned about the future of this country.” Marriotti began. “If we have the president of the United States trying to work together with Congress to defund law enforcement, it’s basically a statement that the president is above the law.”

“I think it’s a very scary thing for our country. and I hope that people in Congress would not support that strategy, because it is frankly a very dangerous thing for this country,” he added.

Falling back on his Nixon years, Dean equated Bannon’s comments to the notorious “Saturday Night Massacre” that saw Nixon firing Watergate investigator Archibald Cox — which only hastened Nixon’s demise.

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“That’s a modified form of firing Archibald Cox, cutting off funding to the special counsel,” Dean lectured. “I’m not sure it lends towards obstruction of justice and Bannon saying let’s all conspire toward justice. But they’re playing with fire here and I think people who sign on to this have to be very careful.”

Watch the video below via CNN:


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2020 Election

Trump supporter accused of voter fraud invited to apply for a pardon — in gratitude for proving ‘how hard voter fraud is’

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On Wednesday, writing on Twitter, Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman invited a Trump supporter accused of voter fraud to apply for a pardon if convicted — in thanks for showing Pennsylvania voters, and Republicans around the country, how difficult it is to commit voter fraud.

The case centers on a man in Forty Fort, Luzerne County, who allegedly filled out an absentee ballot application for his deceased mother with the intention of casting a second ballot for President Donald Trump, in her name. He faces up to 10 years in prison if found guilty.

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2020 Election

Georgia GOP secretary of state: Trump ‘threw my family under the bus’ even though we voted for him

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Brad Raffensperger, the Republican secretary of state in Georgia, has written an angry editorial for USA Today in which he details the harassment he and his family have been subjected to because he followed the law and certified President-elect Joe Biden's victory.

Raffensperger starts out his editorial by praising the Peach State for holding a free and fair election under difficult circumstances stemming from the novel coronavirus pandemic.

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‘The election wasn’t stolen — he blew it’: Michigan Republican says Trump ‘did everything possible to lose’

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President Donald Trump insists the election was stolen from him in Michigan, but Republicans there haven't been willing to indulge his fantasy.

The president has zeroed in on the state, which he narrowly won in 2016, in his effort to overturn his election loss to Joe Biden by claiming widespread fraud and pressuring legislators to overrule the will of the voters, but few Republicans are buying in, reported Politico.

“We must not attempt to exercise power we simply don’t have,” said Aaron Van Langevelde, who sits on Michigan’s board of state canvassers, which was statutorily obligated to certify the election win by Joe Biden. “As John Adams once said, 'We are a government of laws, not men.' This board needs to adhere to that principle here today. This board must do its part to uphold the rule of law and comply with our legal duty to certify this election.”

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