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WATCH: Counter-protesters rock out to ‘La Bamba’ as white supremacist leader speaks at Tennessee march

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On Saturday, anti-racist protesters at Shelbyville, TN’s “White Lives Matter” march trolled white supremacist leader Michael Hill by blasting latino rocker Ritchie Valens’ 1958 hit song, “La Bamba.”

Neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other far-right marchers gathered in Shelbyville on Saturday to march and chant Nazi Party slogans like “Blood and soil” as they brandished homemade shields and other weapons.

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“You can party all you want to,” said Hill angrily, “but we are just getting started.”

“We know who we are, we are the people,” he continued, shouting into a hand-held microphone, “who civilized this land.”

He struggled to be heard, however, over the the exuberant rhythms of “La Bamba.”

Valens was a Mexican-American singer from California who was the first U.S. Latino to cross over into mainstream rock and roll. He died at the age of 18 in a plane crash that also killed singers Buddy Holly and The Big Bopper.

The February, 1959 crash has since become known as “The Day the Music Died,” after folk singer Don McLean memorialized it in a song of the same name.

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‘Pandemics expose the fissures of society’: Rev. William Barber tells CNN why people of color are hurt most by COVID-19

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The Rev. William Barber told CNN's Alisyn Camerota on Thursday that the COVID-19 pandemic has shown a light on racial and economic inequality in the United States, as statistics are showing a disproportionate number of people of color are dying from the disease.

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As the COVID-19 epidemic continues to ravage the American public, an unsurprising story emerges: Poor communities are hot spots for COVID transmission. The death rate from COVID-19 appears to be staggeringly high among African Americans compared to whites. The Washington Post reports, for example, that while 14% of the Michigan population is black, 40% of COVID-19 deaths are among blacks.

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