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Parkland survivor slams GOP for shrugging off dead kids — but freaking out over ‘rainbow wedding cakes’

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Cameron Kasky on CNN -- screenshot

Speaking with CNN host Anderson Cooper, a survivor of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, lambasted Republicans who sell their votes to the NRA — taking specific aim at his Republican U.S. senator and governor.

According to Cameron Kasky, there were many heroes at the Florida high school where former student Nikolas Cruz killed 17 people on Wednesday — but he sees no heroism in the words of Republicans who only offer their “thought and prayers.”

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“I’ve never been to a school after a shooting like this where I’ve met so many students talking about issues of guns when so many politicians are saying now is not the time to talk about the it,” host Cooper began.

“Everybody has done an amazing job responding to this: the Stoneman Douglas community, the Parkland community — everyone is supportive and grieving and inspired,” Kasky replied. “We’re going to use this to try to make something better out of it.”

“Do you think change is possible in terms of the kind of change you want?” the CNN host asked.

“Everything I’ve heard where we can’t do anything and it’s out of our hands and it’s inevitable, I think that’s a facade that the GOP is putting up,” He replied before turning on the NRA. “After every shooting the NRA sends a memo saying ‘send your thoughts and prayers.’ This is the only country where this kind of thing happens. I’ve heard from other people, they don’t have gun drills. We had to prepare extensively at Stoneman Douglas. This is something that can be stopped and will be stopped.”

“There is a segment of this society that will shrug this off and send their thoughts and prayers but march for hours over a rainbow wedding cake” he added.

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“Do you worry, a week from now when the media moves on, that this will become another in a long line of tragedies?” Cooper pressed.

“That was the thought I had. I’m not worried,” Kasky stated. “This can be stopped — this needs to be stopped.”

“For those saying ‘thoughts and prayers and this is not the time to talk about guns,” Cooper asked.

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“This is the time to talk about guns,” Kasky immediately replied. “But there’s much more that can be done, much more that needs to be done and much more that people like Sen Marco Rubio and Governor Rick Scott are not doing. It’s scary to think these are the people who are making our laws when our community just took 17 bullets to the heart. It feels like the only people who don’t care are the people making the laws.”

“There is a segment of this society that will shrug this off and send their thoughts and prayers but march for hours over a rainbow wedding cake,” he later added.

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Watch the video below via CNN:

CNN_02-16-2018_Kasky from Tom Boggioni on Vimeo.


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2020 Election

GOP congressman gets #StopTheStupid trending big-time against Donald Trump — but there’s a catch

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The hashtag #stopthestupid was trending last night on Twitter thanks to -- of all people -- a conservative Republican congressman from Michigan named Paul Mitchell. But before anyone gets too excited that Republicans are discovering integrity, there’s an asterisk: Mitchell is retiring in January.

Here’s what the exasperated congressman tweeted Sunday night in response to Trump’s lunatic ranting about the election outcome:

https://twitter.com/RepPaulMitchell/status/1333214085341712388?s=20

Sunday night, there were more than 21,000 tweets featuring #stopthestupid, many of them wondering aloud why more Republicans cannot show the spine and integrity displayed by Mitchell. Most presumably don’t realize, however, that he’s leaving Congress after just two terms in office.

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The Arab uprisings were weakened by online fakes

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The Arab uprisings a decade ago were supercharged by online calls to join the protests -- but the internet was soon flooded with misinformation, weakening the region's cyber-activists.

When Tunisian dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali fled the country in January 2011, rumours and uncertainty created "panic and hysteria", said ex-activist and entrepreneur Houeida Anouar.

"January 14 was a horrible night, so traumatic," she said. "We heard gunfire, and a neighbour shouted 'hide yourselves, they're raping women'."

As pro-regime media pumped out misinformation, the flood of bogus news also spread to the internet, a space activists had long seen as a refuge from censorship and propaganda.

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Dr. Fauci warns of post-Thanksgiving COVID-19 surge in US

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The United States is the worst-affected country, with 266,074 Covid-19 deaths, and President Donald Trump's administration has issued conflicting messages on mask-wearing, travel and the danger posed by the virus.

"There almost certainly is going to be an uptick because of what has happened with the travel," Fauci told CNN's "State of the Union."

Travel surrounding Thursday's Thanksgiving holiday made this the busiest week in US airports since the pandemic began.

"We may see a surge upon a surge" in two or three weeks, Fauci added. "We don't want to frighten people, but that's the reality."

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