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MSNBC’s Morning Joe thinks Nunberg’s TV meltdown is a ‘smokescreen’: ‘Trump and Roger Stone would be proud’

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MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough said former Trump campaign aide Sam Nunberg’s on-air meltdown Monday on various cable news programs is a very bad sign for the president.

The “Morning Joe” host said the shocking outbursts by Nunberg — who was fired twice by Trump, first in February 2014 and then in August 2015 — and another crazed morning tweet from President Donald Trump showed how high the special counsel had ramped up pressure.

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“There’s so much evidence out there that again, a tweet like Donald Trump’s really does — it just seems to prove what (former CIA director John) Brennan said, and that is how nervous he is becoming with where this (Robert) Mueller investigation is going,” Scarborough said.

Co-host Willie Geist agreed, saying the president’s panicked tweets showed how isolated and alone as the investigation closed in.

“We know the president watches a lot of cable news, yesterday could not have been comforting,” Geist said. “You can try to say he was a guy that he fired, which is true in august of 2015, but the fact is Sam Nunberg provided a window into Bob Mueller’s investigation. You have to take some of what he said with a grain of salt, but there is no question that President Trump is worried about what’s happening and he’s going to build up whatever smokescreen he can find to distract people from it.”

Scarborough suspected, however, that Nunberg’s bizarre, and possibly alcohol-fueled, outburst was part of a setup to protect his political mentor and “surrogate father,” Republican dirty trickster Roger Stone, and his old boss.

“Sam Nunberg, a former campaign guy who’s now in the focus of the special prosecutor, panicking, literally having a nervous, what appeared to be a nervous breakdown, on national TV on as many outlets as possible,” Scarborough said. “I’m sure both Donald Trump and Roger Stone would have been very proud of him.”

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Scarborough pointed back to communications director Hope Hicks, who abruptly resigned the day after testifying for hours before the House Intelligence Committee, and Trump’s irrational reaction to the departure of his “emotional support” in the White House.

“After he hears she’s going to depart, him losing it and deciding he’s going to start a trade war,” Scarborough said. “Kind of like kicking a dog because you’re an angry child. It seems like, again, the wheels are starting to come off.”

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‘Giuliani did all the wrong things’ on 9/11: Investigative reporter Wayne Barrett

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Janine Jackson interviewed the Village Voice’s Wayne Barrett about Rudy Giuliani and 9/11 for the August 17, 2007, episode of CounterSpin; that conversation was rebroadcast for the November 29, 2019, show. This is a lightly edited transcript.

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Teenage boy’s family objects to ProPublica publication of video detailing his death

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The family of a teenage boy whose death ProPublica investigated has objected to the publication of a surveillance video that documented his last hours.

Yesterday, ProPublica published a detailed account of failings and missteps by the U.S. Border Patrol, in whose custody 16-year-old Carlos Gregorio Hernandez Vasquez died. As part of the story, ProPublica published several moments from a lengthy surveillance video in which Carlos struggles on the floor of his cell and then stops moving. The video, which had not been shared with Congress or the public, contradicts the government’s claim that Carlos was discovered as a result of a “welfare check.’’ It shows that his cellmate awoke, saw his motionless body, and summoned Border Patrol agents.

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Mass rally marks six-month anniversary of Hong Kong protest movement

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Hong Kong democracy protesters are hoping for huge crowds later Sunday at a rally they have billed as a "last chance" for the city's pro-Beijing leaders in a major test for the six-month-old movement.

The march comes two weeks after pro-establishment parties got a drubbing in local elections, shattering government claims that a "silent majority" opposed the protests.

But activists say public anger is building once more after chief executive Carrie Lam and Beijing ruled out any further concessions despite the landslide election defeat.

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